Fast & Furious: Hobbs & Shaw – Meet the Characters

FAST & FURIOUS: HOBBS & SHAW

MEET THE CHARACTERS

By Jedd Jong

“I don’t have friends, I got family” – so said Vin Diesel’s Dominic Toretto in Furious 7. Dom and the other main characters of the Fast and Furious franchise might not appear in Fast & Furious: Hobbs & Shaw, but this spinoff gets audiences acquainted with the ‘extended family’.

Luke Hobbs (Dwayne Johnson) and Deckard Shaw (Jason Statham) make an unlikely team: one’s a righteous DSS agent, the other’s a shadowy SAS officer-turned-mercenary with a criminal history. Naturally, Hobbs and Shaw have not exactly gotten along in the past – in Furious 7, they had a vicious throw-down in the Los Angeles Diplomatic Security Services office, which left Hobbs hospitalised for most of that film. In the following film, Hobbs ends up in the same prison in which Shaw is held, and the duo fight their way out together.

When nothing less than the fate of the world is at stake, Hobbs and Shaw must set their differences aside and begrudgingly team up. Read on to learn about our titular duo and the other badass characters you’ll meet in Hobbs & Shaw.

LUKE HOBBS (DWAYNE JOHNSON)

Director David Leitch and Dwayne Johnson

Agent Luke Hobbs is a United States Diplomatic Security Service (DSS) agent and bounty hunter who entered the Fast and Furious series in Fast Five. In that film, he was hunting our heroes, but eventually came to respect and team up with them. Since that movie’s release in 2011, there has been talk of a Hobbs-centric spin-off, which has finally come to fruition.

Hobbs is a dedicated family man, raising his daughter Samantha (Eden Estrella) alone. In Hobbs & Shaw, we get to meet Hobbs’ long-lost family back home in Samoa, including his mother Sefina (Lori Pelenise Tuisano) and his brothers Jonah (Cliff Curtis), Mateo (Roman Reigns), Timo (Josh Magua) and Kal (John Tui). Wrestler Reigns is Johnson’s cousin in real life. Johnson further gets in touch with his Samoan roots by performing the Siva Tau, a traditional Samoan war dance akin to the Māori haka, before the film’s big action finale. Johnson is Samoan on his mother’s side, and a photo of his real father Rocky Johnson can be glimpsed in the background in Hobbs & Shaw.

“Hobbs has always been a personal character for be because so much of Hobbs and his DNA derive from who I am as a human being and a man,” Johnson told Kidzworld, calling Hobbs & Shaw “a deeply personal film”. He compared depicting his Samoan heritage in this film to showcasing Polynesian culture in Moana, in which he voiced the demigod Maui.

We’ve seen Hobbs wield a variety of weapons and do some hand-to-hand fights, but in Hobbs & Shaw, he gets truly visceral. Johnson said he has “waited his entire career” to perform fight scenes that are “raging, savage and primal and without weapons or without guns,” which we see when Hobbs leads his Samoan compatriots into battle at the end of the film.

DECKARD SHAW (JASON STATHAM)

Jason Statham and director David Leitch

Deckard Shaw arrived in the Fast and Furious series with a bang, murdering the character Han (Sung Kang) in the post-credits scene of Fast & Furious 6. The character is a former United Kingdom Special Forces operative who went rogue. Deckard’s brother Owen was the main villain of Fast & Furious 6, and Deckard waged war against Dom and his crew to seek vengeance for Owen’s defeat.

Shaw transitioned into a heroic role in The Fate of the Furious, in which he and Owen helped to save Dom’s baby from the villain Cipher’s (Charlize Theron) plane. By the end of that film, it seemed like Deckard had been accepted into Dom’s family, but as we learn in Hobbs & Shaw, he and Hobbs are far from bosom buddies.

The film is filled with back-and-forth smack talk between the two leads, which spilled over into real life. Statham proclaimed that Johnson was too big to fit into the McLaren the two ride in during a London-set chase scene. “We had to CG him into the McLaren,” Statham quipped. “One: his arse was too big to get into the seat, and two: he gets very nauseous when we’re going rather fast. Because he’s more used to driving these big lumbering trucks, so anything over 30 miles per hour, he gets a little nauseous.”

Just as we meet Hobbs’ brothers, Shaw’s family also figures into the film: Helen Mirren returns from The Fate of the Furious for a brief appearance as Shaw’s mother Magdalene, while Vanessa Kirby stars as Shaw’s younger sister Hattie: more on her later.

“It’s a great privilege for many reasons,” Statham told ET Canada about being part of the Fast and Furious series. “Franchises don’t last more than two or three, and if you’re lucky four – this has gone on and on and on.” He said that the team behind the Fast and Furious series “try to make movies that strike a chord with people, and the fanbase of these movies is so passionate. It means a lot to be part of these films.”

BRIXTON LORE (IDRIS ELBA)

Hobbs and Shaw need a formidable opponent, and they don’t come more formidable than Brixton Lore. Idris Elba portrays the former compatriot of Shaw’s, who has been subjected to a series of cybernetic upgrades which have made him a superhuman fighter. Brixton works for a shadowy organisation called Eteon, who use him as a tool in implementing a terrifying new world order – a world in which Hobbs and Shaw have no part.

Elba visibly enjoyed playing the over-the-top supervillain, telling ET Canada that “It’s super exciting to me just because it’s one of the most successful franchises in the world.” Elba described the way Brixton was written as “very exciting,” adding that “he’s a real sort of step away from the kind of characters I get to play.”

“David and I really talked about how we want[ed] to take this complex human being who has been killed before and brought back to life and made into this robot and make a believable bad guy,” Elba told Digital Spy. “He works for Eteon, for this company, and their ideology is to wipe out half the planet and save ourselves,” Elba added. “That’s kind of a complicated thing to get your mind around.”

One of the fancy toys at Brixton’s disposal is a futuristic robot motorcycle, which was an added draw for Elba, who is a motoring enthusiast in real life. “It is definitely one of the highlights of making a film in this [franchise], if you like cars, you like automobiles, you like speed, this is the one you want to do,” Elba said. “A lot of the bike stuff was real and the CGI stuff was definitely an enhancement of what we shot,” Elba stated, adding that “the bike kept evolving” in concept from the script to the finished film.

HATTIE SHAW (VANESSA KIRBY)  

Hobbs and Shaw can’t save the world alone, and it becomes a family affair when Shaw’s younger sister Hattie, an MI6 agent who has been targeted by Brixton, is drawn into the fray. Hattie throws a spanner in Brixton and Eteon’s plans to unleash a deadly virus on the world, meaning she as is important as the two leads in preventing global destruction.

Actress Vanessa Kirby is the first to admit she never thought she would be starring in a Fast and Furious movie alongside Dwayne Johnson and Jason Statham. “I never thought I’d be in action movies ever, it’s not my natural habitat,” Kirby told ET Canada, insisting “I belong on stage!”

However, she acquits herself well, taking the role seriously. “Vanessa Kirby maybe kicks — dare I say — at least as much ass as the guys,” executive producer Kelly McCormick told Us Weekly. “She showed up, she worked out, she learned how to fight.” Kirby was in Mission: Impossible – Fallout, but did not get a lot of action to perform herself. In this film, she even gets a one-on-one fight with Johnson himself.

“It’s really important to represent women in action movies in a certain way, and this is a massive opportunity to do that,” Kirby said, saying she seized the chance “to change something for little girls in the audience.”

“If you remember all the movies growing up like E.T., it was always the boys that get to do everything,” Kirby remarked, adding that the filmmakers ensured that Hattie “was never saved or never rescued by the men, that she was always actually getting herself out of the situation, even to the extent that she saves them at some point,” Kirby pointed out. “It definitely feels like a time when we’re able to do that and there’s a responsibility to do that.”

Fast & Furious: Hobbs & Shaw opens in theatres on 1 August 2019

Deadpool 2 review

For inSing

DEADPOOL 2

Director : David Leitch
Cast : Ryan Reynolds, Josh Brolin, Julian Dennison, Morena Baccarin, Zazie Beetz, Stefan Kapičić, Leslie Uggams, Karan Soni
Genre : Action / Adventure
Run Time : 120 mins
Opens : 17 May 2018
Rating : M18 (Violence & Coarse Language)

The Merc with the Mouth is back and mouthier than ever, and he’s brought along friends.

Maybe “friends” is too strong a word.

Wade Wilson/Deadpool (Ryan Reynolds), the wise-cracking, nigh-indestructible killer for hire, is settling down with his girlfriend Vanessa (Morena Baccarin), in between a busy schedule of hit jobs around the world. Wade has his already topsy-turvy life turned further upside down by the arrival of an unexpected guest. Nathan Summers/Cable (Josh Brolin), a grizzled cyborg from the future has travelled to the present with a mission. His target: Russell “Rusty” Collins/Firefist (Julian Dennison), a young mutant who will grow up into a murderous tyrant if his impulses are left unchecked. Rusty has been raised in an orphanage where he and the other mutant orphans have been abused by the principal and orderlies.

Deadpool realises he’ll need the help of allies old and new, including former roommate Blind Al (Leslie Uggams), bartender and pal Weasel (T.J. Miller), taxi driver Dopinder (Karan Soni), the metal-skinned Piotr Rasputin/Colossus (Stefan Kapičić), who is still trying to recruit Deadpool to join the X-Men, and Neena Thurman/Domino (Zazie Beetz), a mutant with the power of preternaturally good luck. Wade also tries assembling his own mutant superhero team called the ‘X-Force’, to mixed results.

The first Deadpool film faced an uphill battle in getting made and proved to be wildly successful among critics and audiences. That film faced countless behind-the-scenes bureaucratic issues stemming from the Fox top brass and had to work around the resulting budget cuts, but Reynolds’ pet project finally came to fruition.

Deadpool 2 faces a similar situation as Guardians of the Galaxy: Vol. 2 – the underdog has triumphed, resources are being thrown at the sequel, and now’s the time to prove there are more tricks up the filmmakers’ sleeves. There’s also a deeper dive into the source material, with long-anticipated characters making their big screen debuts.

Writers Rhett Reese and Paul Wernick are back for the sequel, with Reynolds credited as the third writer. The first film’s director Tim Miller has been replaced by David Leitch, veteran stunt coordinator and one half of the John Wick directing team.

Deadpool 2 gets a lot right, and is a movie that’s comfortable in its mottled, sore-covered skin. Many of the self-referential jokes are brilliant, the action sequences are more elaborate and involved, the casting for new characters is excellent, and Reynolds settles further into what has become his signature role. However, all this doesn’t quite fit together as well as it should have. There are times when the editing feels choppy, and characters enter the plot inorganically, coming off more as plot devices than actually developed characters.

The irreverent, tongue-in-cheek tone of the movie is a double-edged sword. There are plenty of funny comic book movies, yes, but none that so freely and frequently take shots at other, specific films. It’s intrinsic to the Deadpool character, but the barrage of snarky quips can wear viewers down. It’s also a little tricky to decide when the film is trying to be genuine and when it’s trying to be ironic, the side effect being that any moments that are potentially emotional get robbed of their effect. Deadpool’s motivation in this film is one that’s been seen a lot and nullifies the emotional drive of the first film.

Beneath the violence, swearing and fourth wall-breaking humour, the first Deadpool film had a very traditional origin story structure. Deadpool 2 almost doesn’t have enough of a structure, which some might argue suits the character. However, when the jokes take precedence over the story, the stakes are blunted and everything feels inconsequential. While the humour in the Guardians of the Galaxy films sometimes stepped on the emotional beats, those movies did a slightly better job in juggling the jokes and the heartfelt moments than Deadpool 2 does.

Brolin is an ideal Cable, and yes, we do get a line about how he doesn’t quite match the stature of the character in the comics. Brolin is shredded and plays a great straight man to Reynolds. Beetz has the kick-ass attitude that’s key to Domino, and after seeing her performance, it doesn’t matter the character doesn’t look like she’s usually drawn. The film is dedicated in memory of Sequana Harris, the Domino stunt double who died in an accident on set.

Leitch is no stranger to large-scale action set pieces and the central prison truck chase is staged with energy and finesse. A lot of the close-quarters combat looks great and the canvas has been increased from the first film. However, one character who is completely rendered in CGI looks incredibly awkward and difficult to buy as occupying the same space as the other characters.

Deadpool 2 strains to subvert expectations and deliver more of what everyone came for but suffers from a lack of focus. It’s all one big joke, as it should be, and on that level, Deadpool 2 is entertaining. It’s calibrated to reward fans who’ll catch all the references and whisper in their friends’ ears “Rob Liefeld, the artist who co-created Deadpool, is terrible at drawing feet”. However, as much as the movie wants to be shocking, the films winds up being pretty lightweight, enjoyable without making as much of an impact as it could have.

The mid-credits scene is an absolute hoot, but perhaps jokes about a certain entry in Reynolds’ filmography are wearing a little thin by now.

RATING: 3.5 out of 5 Stars

Jedd Jong

Atomic Blonde

For F*** Magazine

ATOMIC BLONDE 

Director : David Leitch
Cast : Charlize Theron, James McAvoy, John Goodman, Toby Jones, Sofia Boutella, Eddie Marsan, James Faulkner
Genre : Action/Thriller
Run Time : 1h 55m
Opens : 27 July 2017
Rating : R21 (Some Homosexual Content)

Charlize Theron goes from traversing the arid, scorching desert of Mad Max: Fury Road to sauntering into the coldest city in this action thriller. It is 1989, days before the fall of the Berlin Wall, and MI6 agent James Gascoine (Sam Hargrave) is killed by a KGB operative in West Berlin. Gascoine’s colleague and former lover Lorraine Broughton (Theron), one of MI6’s deadliest operatives, is sent behind the Iron Curtain to recover sensitive information stolen from Gascoine. Lorraine must work alongside MI6’s Berlin station chief David Percival (McAvoy), who is often drunk and unreliable. Lorraine’s mission is to track down a mark known only as ‘Spyglass’ (Marsan). She gets entangled with French spy Delphine Lasalle (Boutella), and Lorraine’s actions frustrate her superiors Eric Gray (Jones) of MI6 and Emmet Kurzfeld (Goodman) of CIA. Caught in a geopolitical firestorm and pitted against the most treacherous of enemies, Lorraine must retrieve the documents at all costs.

Atomic Blonde is based on the graphic novel The Coldest City, written by Antony Johnston and illustrated by Sam Hart. Directing the film is David Leitch, who co-directed John Wick with Chad Stahelski and who is also helming the upcoming Deadpool 2. Leitch employs a great deal of stylisation, crafting a brutal, sexy ‘neon-noir’. However, unlike John Wick, Atomic Blonde doesn’t lean into its heightened absurdity as much, and takes itself a little too seriously.

As with any espionage thriller, the plot is a web of double-crosses, shifting alliances and twisty reveals. Atomic Blonde hints at the fraught geopolitical climate of the time, but is far from substantive. While Atomic Blonde succeeds as a mood piece, it is too coolly detached for audiences to get involved in the story. With its title cards rendered as spray-painted graffiti text and its action set to songs by Queen, David Bowie, Depeche Mode and Kanye West, Atomic Blonde is sometimes too enamoured with its coolness for its own good.

Coming from a stunt performer/coordinator background and having co-founded the stunt collective 87Eleven Action Design, Leitch knows a thing or two about action sequences. Atomic Blonde showcases several elaborate, wince-inducing combat sequences, and doesn’t skimp on the blood splatter when people get shot in the head. It is inevitable that this gets compared to John Wick – we’ve already done that earlier in this review. As masterfully as the stunts are executed, the balletic gunfights in John Wick were more dazzling, and that film’s juxtaposition of elegance and brutality more beguiling, than the action on show in Atomic Blonde.

Theron is an outspoken feminist, and Atomic Blonde has been characterised as a feminist action movie. The screenplay is written by Kurt Johnstad, who has penned such “manly men” flicks as 300 and Act of Valour, and the film’s female characters are very much sexualised. However, Theron owns the character’s sexuality, and while it can be argued that moments like a lesbian sex scene are exploitative, she displays such conviction that it doesn’t feel sleazy. This is a role that’s right in Theron’s wheelhouse – Lorraine is slinky, lethal and unafraid to get her hands very dirty. We get very little in the way of back-story or meaningful character motivations, but Lorraine is intended to be an enigma and Theron relishes the cloak and dagger machinations her character enacts.

As is expected of McAvoy when he gets to play characters a little on the wild side, he puts in an entertaining turn. David plays second fiddle to Lorraine, and McAvoy has no qualms letting Theron take the spotlight. The openly hostile dynamic between the two ostensible allies contains glimmers of fun, but McAvoy and Theron don’t get to play off each other as much as this reviewer hoped.

Boutella’s Delphine is very much the traditional Bond girl: she’s in her over depth, and is seduced and taken advantage of by the hero(ine). It can be argued that the much buzzed-about lesbian sex scene between Lorraine and Delphine is gratuitous, but Theron has argued that it’s an example of women owning their sexuality in a mainstream film, something we don’t see a lot of. In the meantime, Goodman and Jones show up mostly to facilitate the framing device of Lorraine being debriefed/interrogated in the aftermath of her Berlin mission. Unlike Theron and Boutella, they do not have a sex scene together.

As a platform for Charlize Theron to strut her action heroine stuff, Atomic Blonde works well. However, its convoluted spy vs. spy narrative is at odds with its stylishness and devil-may-care vibe. Atomic Blonde gets bogged down with considerable amounts of plot to get through in between the action while not possessing much depth, but Theron’s virtuosic badassery make it worthwhile.

Summary: While not as compulsively entertaining as it could’ve been, Atomic Blonde packs in plenty of style and showcases Charlize Theron in full action heroine mode.

RATING: 3.5 out of 5 Stars

Jedd Jong

John Wick

For F*** Magazine

JOHN WICK

Director : Chad Stahelski, David Leitch
Cast : Keanu Reeves, Michael Nyqvist, Alfie Allen, Adrianne Palicki, Ian McShane, Willem Dafoe, Lance Reddick, Bridget Moynahan
Genre : Action/Thriller
Opens : 23 October 2014
Rating : NC-16 (Violence and Coarse Language) 
Run time: 96 mins
In The Matrix, when Neo was asked what he needed, he replied “guns. Lots of guns.” As the eponymous former hitman in this film, Keanu Reeves once again gets to wield an array of firearms – oh, and he also “knows kung-fu”. A hired gun who used to work for the Russian mob, John Wick’s now-normal life is falling to pieces after he loses his wife (Moynahan) to illness. Her last gift to him, an adorable little Beagle, is now the thing he holds dearest. Mob heir Iosef Tarasov (Allen), not knowing who Wick is, steals his Mustang and kills his dog. It turns out that Wick used to work for Iosef’s father, the crime boss Viggo (Nyqvist). Viggo puts a price on Wick’s head and Wick is pursued by killers including femme fatale Perkins (Palicki) and his old friend Marcus (Dafoe). All those deadly, well-honed skills come bubbling back to the surface in a big way once Wick is set off.’

            John Wick is the feature film directorial debut of Chad Stahelski and David Leitch, veteran stunt performers, coordinators and second unit directors who run the 87eleven Action Design collective. Stahelski’s credits include 300, The Hunger Games, V For Vendetta and Reeves’ own The Man of Tai Chi while Leitch was Brad Pitt’s stunt double in Fight Club, Spy Game, Ocean’s Eleven and Mr. and Mrs. Smith. People like Stahelski and Leitch definitely number among Hollywood’s unsung heroes and hopefully John Wick plays a big part in making them household names. This action thriller is sleek and handsomely directed and, as expected, the stunt sequences are superb. Aficionados of the genre have no doubt seen countless shootouts, throwdowns and car chases in their time and while those in John Wick aren’t earth-shatteringly inventive, the skill with which they’re orchestrated and executed is admirable.

            On paper, John Wick sounds like your typical “one man army” revenge flick – after fighting to escape his former life, our hero has to plunge back into the deep end to violently settle a score. In many ways, John Wick is a conventional genre entry. However, it is several notches above run of the mill and a big part of that is the intriguing mini-mythology presented in the story. Central to the plot is a hotel called “The Continental”, which serves as a safe haven and neutral ground for assassins and hired guns. This subculture has its own currency and there’s a regular crew who helps clean up the bodies. There’s an “understanding” between people like Wick and the police. The New York setting is heightened but not ridiculous and the action sequences have panache but don’t come off as stagey and over-choreographed. Mood-wise, the film also benefits immensely from Stahelski and Leitch’s conscious decision to avoid shaky-cam and quick-cut editing, allowing the action sequences to play out in the semi-balletic yet still brutal glory.

            In Death Wish-esque, “one man army carves a swath of vengeance”-type movies, a whole lot hinges on the lead actor. Keanu Reeves is often dismissed as “wooden” but this reviewer did buy him as the cool, quietly badass John Wick. There’s a haunted quality to his face, particularly his eyes, in this film and he gets to bring some of that “Sad Keanu”-ness to bear without it ever being maudlin. A character who takes on the Russian mob to avenge the death of his dog does have the potential for some major league silliness but in Reeves’ hands, it’s all kept under control. As a Russian kingpin in an action movie, Michael Nyqvist is almost contractually obligated to chew some scenery and while there’s that, there are also moments where he’s effectively understated. Alfie Allen’s Iosef is a sufficiently unlikeable petulant brat. Both Ian McShane and Willem Dafoe lend some dignified gravitas to the proceedings. It’s only Adrianne Palicki who seems rather out of place, not altogether convincing as a cold killer.

            John Wick reminded this reviewer of the recent The Equalizer starring Denzel Washington as a similar “killer comes out of retirement” character. However, in that film, there was the danger of the “cool factor” being overplayed and coming off as forced or unintentionally comedic. Here, Stahelski and Leitch have attained a level of consistency. There’s a bit of a 70s movie-type stylisation with several scenes being neon-lit and the subtitles that appear when characters speak Russian having individual words emphasised with neon colouring. Sure, this is not particularly heavy on substance, but it doesn’t drown in its style either. With the masterfully-crafted action scenes, the stylish mood-setting, just the right level of genre savvy and the brisk pace in John Wick, we do want to see what Leitch and Stahelski tackle next.


Summary: John Wickcontains many staples of the “assassin movie” subgenre but the directors put their stunt-creating experience to marvellous use and Keanu Reeves makes for a convincing hitman in this slick, entertaining genre entry.
RATING: 4 out of 5 Stars

Jedd Jong