Godzilla vs Kong review

For F*** Magazine

Director: Adam Wingard
Cast : Alexander Skarsgård, Millie Bobby Brown, Rebecca Hall, Brian Tyree Henry, Shun Oguri, Eiza González, Kyle Chandler, Julian Dennison, Demián Bichir, Kaylee Hottle
Genre: Action/Adventure/Sci-fi
Run Time : 113 min
Opens : 24 March 2021
Rating : PG13

In 1962, two of cinema’s defining monsters faced off in King Kong vs Godzilla. 59 years later, it’s time for a rematch, in the form of the fourth film in the Monsterverse.

Kong is living on Skull Island, where he has formed a bond with young orphan Jia (Kaylee Hottle), who communicates with Kong via sign language. Jia’s adoptive mother is researcher Dr Ilene Andrews (Rebecca Hall), who has been monitoring Kong for years. Geologist Dr Nathan Lind (Alexander Skarsgård) discovers a way to access the hollow earth, the speculated origin of Kong, Godzilla and the other Titans. As part of an expedition funded by Walter Simmons (Demián Bichir), the CEO of tech company Apex Cybernetics, Ilene, Nathan, Jia and Walter’s daughter Maia (Eiza González) accompany Kong to the access point of the hollow earth. Kong’s presence attracts Godzilla, who has suddenly turned aggressive towards humans despite having been thought of as a defender. In the meantime, Madison (Millie Bobby Brown), daughter of Monarch director Mark Russell (Kyle Chandler), alongside her friend Josh (Julian Dennison) and Apex technician Bernie (Bryan Tyree Henry), embarks on a mission to unearth a conspiracy at the corporation.  

Godzilla vs Kong is delightfully bonkers, leaning fully into the ridiculousness of its premise, and dropping all pretence of being grounded or realistic. It’s an entertaining ride made by people who clearly love the Kaiju genre, and want to deliver an exciting, spectacle-heavy, example of that genre. Director Adam Wingard and cinematographer Ben Seresin make this a colourful, visually exciting movie, especially after the immediate predecessor, Godzilla: King of the Monsters, was criticised for looking visually muddy. In some ways, this movie harks back to the Heisei Era of Godzilla movies, nicknamed the “Vs series”. It also harks back to goofy 50s-60s Hollywood sci-fi adventure movies, like Journey to the Centre of the Earth (1959). Characters fly around in nifty little crafts called Hollow Earth Aerial Vehicles, and one can imagine a great motion simulator theme park ride centred on those. There’s more than a little Pacific Rim influence here too, especially in the Hong Kong battle.

Leaning more heavily into sci-fi than the previous films in this continuity, Godzilla vs Kong contains a literal journey to the centre of the earth and is an ode to absurdly impractical infrastructure projects. It’s only fitting given the sheer size of its two stars. The character animation on both Kong and Godzilla is excellent; the physicality and expressiveness of both monsters conveyed well. Kong, having become more grizzled in the 50 years since the events of Kong: Skull Island, has plenty of personality, and is easy to relate to when he just stands around and sighs, or gets tired after a fight and must lie down. The fight scenes between them are grand and well-choreographed, and if it’s big-budget monster fights you’re after, this movie has you covered.

If Godzilla (2014) was too self-serious, then Godzilla vs Kong is sometimes too silly for its own good. Many moments strain credulity, and there is a level of “just go with it”-ness that Wingard sometimes struggles to sustain. There are several huge leaps of faith that are demanded of the audience, and one’s willingness to take those leaps will vary. While there are some surprises, the plot is predictable, and many fans have already called the outcome of the battle between Godzilla and Kong, which some might feel is at least a bit of a cop out. As satisfying as the spectacle is, the story can’t quite support it – and this is going by monster movie standards.

Every Kaiju movie fan’s favourite pastime is complaining about the human characters, who are meant to be our way into the story, but more often than not get in the way of the monsters punching each other. There are two main human plots here: all the stuff with Skarsgård’s geologist, Hall’s Kong behaviourist and Hottle’s endearing magical girl who can talk to Kong generally works. Jia is a deaf character portrayed by a deaf actress, which is something that needs to happen more often.

The other human plot, with Brown’s Emma returning from the previous movie and joined by Dennison as Emma’s friend and Henry as a hyperactive conspiracy theorist podcast host, generally doesn’t. The normally excellent Henry is grating here, directed to play an over-the-top comic relief character and given a succession of unfunny lines. Most of the film’s least convincing moments involve these characters, and each time the movie cut back to them, groans from the audience were audible.

Caught in between are Demián Bichir and Eiza González as a father-daughter team who possibly have ulterior motives. They put in unsubtle but enjoyable turns.

The Monsterverse has given us interpretations of major Kaiju from the Godzilla mythos, and by now, audiences expect that at least one other monster will show up in a Godzilla movie. Kong does that here, but does anyone else make an appearance? Some of the marketing has spoiled a surprise or two, and while this movie doesn’t lack for spectacle, this reviewer found himself missing the well-defined, iconic creatures whom Kong fought or teamed up with in King of the Monsters.

Summary: Godzilla vs Kong delivers wham-bam monster fights on a grand scale, and is often silly in an earnest, charming way. It is occasionally too silly and, as expected, several human characters are nigh-unbearable, but it’s an all-around good time. See it on the biggest screen possible.

RATING: 3.5 out of 5 Stars

Jedd Jong

Godzilla: King of the Monsters review

GODZILLA: KING OF THE MONSTERS

Director: Michael Dougherty
Cast : Kyle Chandler, Vera Farmiga, Millie Bobby Brown, Ken Watanabe, Zhang Ziyi, Bradley Whitford, Sally Hawkins, Charles Dance, Thomas Middleditch, Aisha Hinds, O’Shea Jackson Jr., David Strathairn
Genre : Action/Adventure/Sci-fi
Run Time : 2 h 12 mins
Opens : 30 May 2019
Rating : PG13

            The king of all monsters is back, and he’s brought friends and enemies with him in this sequel to 2014’s Godzilla.

It has been five years since Godzilla triumphed over the MUTOs in San Francisco. The organisation Monarch has discovered that there are several more ancient megafauna known collectively as ‘Titans’ lying dormant around the world. Dr Emma Russell (Vera Farmiga), a paleobiologist working for Monarch, has developed a device called the Orca that can communicate with the Titans. She has separated from her animal behaviourist husband Mark (Kyle Chandler), formerly also a Monarch employee, and their daughter Madison (Millie Bobby Brown) lives with her.

Alan Jonah (Charles Dance), a defected British Army Colonel who is obsessed with restoring balance to the world, sets off a chain of events that awakens the Titans. These include the benevolent Mothra and the hostile King Ghidorah and Rodan. A team of Monarch scientists led by Dr Ishirō Serizawa (Ken Watanabe) must figure out the best way to put an end to the global rampage caused by the ancient monsters.

Godzilla: King of the Monsters is a movie that gives the people what they want: lots of monsters that fight each other a lot. The film has a rather tricky task of balancing the absurd spectacle and inherent silliness of the kaiju movie genre with a certain gravity to the colossal destruction. Director Michael Dougherty is mostly up to the task, delivering a movie that is reverent of the illustrious history of kaiju films but one that’s also unafraid to have ludicrous amounts of fun.

Part of the beauty of this movie is that it very much knows what it is, and all the actors are aware of this too. It is hard to care too much about the human characters, but the movie knows that the human characters are secondary to the Titans. As a result, it’s not necessarily a bad thing that the dialogue is very cheesy, and that everyone talks exactly how you’d expect characters in a disaster movie to talk. Godzilla: King of the Monsters often stays on just the right side of stupid, and like Kong: Skull Island before it, is very much a B-movie with an A-movie budget.

The visual effects, supervised by Guillaume Rocheron, are plentiful and astounding, with a huge number of creatures and environments to be created in CGI. Many scenes are awe-inspiring, but this reviewer found a quiet sequence in which a submarine comes across an ancient sunken city to be the biggest ‘wow’ moment in the film. The dogfight sequence which pits the Pterodactyl-like Rodan against a squadron of fighter jets is thrilling, satisfying and is the kind of thing that could’ve only been assembled by someone with an abiding affection for this genre.

While the monsters are created digitally, Dougherty took the right approach in hiring special effects houses known for animatronic and prosthetic effects to design them. Amalgamated Dynamics provided the design for Rodan, while Legacy Effects designed Mothra and King Ghidorah. Both studios were founded by former collaborators of Stan Winston, and there are times when the Titans feel like they could be animatronic or performer-in-suit creatures like those seen in Jurassic Park and Aliens. This is also helped by the motion capture performers TJ Storm, who reprises the role of Godzilla from the 2014 film, and Jason Liles, Alan Maxson and Richard Dorton, who play King Ghidorah’s three heads.

Kyle Chandler, Vera Farmiga and Millie Bobby Brown, who play the film’s central family, are taking things seriously enough. While the characters’ back-story and their link to the events of the 2014 film is established effectively, there is not much that’s truly compelling about these characters. Like the rest of the human characters, they are mostly there to react to all the monster mayhem, but Brown especially continues to show what a natural and talented actor she is.

This film gives Ken Watanabe’s Dr Seriwaza more to do besides making grave proclamations, though he still does plenty of that. We get two characters who squarely serve as comic relief and little else, played by Thomas Middleditch and Bradley Whitford. Whitford’s character Rick Stanton is nakedly based on the brilliant but constantly drunk and chaos-prone Rick Sanchez from the Rick and Morty cartoon. This is where the movie is dangerously close to crossing into 90s disaster movie-levels of silliness, but Dougherty doesn’t let the humour get too self-indulgent.

Charles Dance can always be called upon to deliver gravitas with a sinister tinge, which is just what he does here. He’s there to ominously intone lines like “we’ve opened Pandora’s box, and there’s no closing it now,” with just the slightest whiff of irony.

The idea behind Zhang Ziyi’s character is more interesting than the character is in execution is: she’s a third-generation Monarch scientist whose speciality is mythology. The film’s constant references to the legends of old and how mythological beasts were depictions of the Titans is a rich vein that could be further explored in future MonsterVerse movies.

Godzilla: King of the Monsters can sometimes feel like overkill, but then again, a movie about a giant monster battle royale should feel like overkill. The film’s playfulness is exemplified in its choice of end credits song: a cover of Blue Öyster Cult’s “Godzilla” by Serj Tankian and Dethklok, as arranged by the film’s composer Bear McCreary. This is exactly the right approach for a Godzilla movie, and indicates that the film is intent on delivering B-movie delights on a grand scale. It achieves this.

RATING: 4 out of 5 Stars

Jedd Jong

 

2014: The Year In Action

For F*** Magazine

Text:
2014: THE YEAR IN ACTION
Top 10 action movies of 2014
By Jedd Jong
Action movies kind of get a bad rap in high-brow film criticism circles and there’s a perception that film critics will turn up their noses at any movie in which stuff blows up, dismissing an action film outright as “brainless”. Sure, as with every year, 2014 has had its mediocre franchise movies (Transformers: Age of Extinction, The Amazing Spider-Man 2 and Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles didn’t make the cut for this list). But we’ve also had a good number of high-quality action blockbusters too. At F***, we believe there’s definitely such a thing as a “good” action movie, and not just films that are so dumb they’re enjoyable – though there’s a place for that too. On this list, there are a few films that have scored a 90% approval rating or higher over on review aggregating site Rotten Tomatoes, so let it not be said that movie critics as a whole are unable to appreciate the explodier things in life. Let’s get rollin’!
JOHN WICK

During the holiday season of 2013, the Keanu Reeves-starring 47 Roninopened to a largely negative response. It was a historical fantasy mishmash that never quite gelled and Reeves looked out of his element in it. In this year’s John Wick, Reeves gets his mojo back in a big way. 47 Ronin was the inauspicious feature directorial debut of Carl Rinsch. John Wick is the first feature film directed by stunt performers/choreographers Chad Stahelski and David Leitch but it’s a slick, well-constructed affair complete with a colourful mini-mythology built in. There’s a “hitman hotel” called The Continental which is neutral ground and there’s a hitman bar where they all hang out when they’re off the clock! Keanu may not have a ton of range as an actor, but was there anyone who thought the dude from Bill & Ted could pull off playing a highly-trained, cold, lethal assassin? There’s also a pretty badass supporting cast, with Michael Nyqvist as the head of the Russian mob, Willem Dafoe as Wick’s fellow hitman and old friend and Ian McShane as the owner of The Continental. Practically no shaky-cam is a plus as well.
GODZILLA

The King of All Monsters turned the big 6-0 this year and got a grand birthday bash in the form of his second proper Hollywood movie. Die-hard Godzillafans have made no secret of their distaste for the 1998 Roland Emmerich-directed film, so there was a lot riding on this reboot. We at F*** love stories of “promoted fanboys” and Gareth Edwards, a monster movie fan as a kid and the director of the indie creature feature Monsters, landing the job of directing Godzilla ’14 is a great example of that. Sure, it isn’t exactly the best use of Bryan Cranston or Ken Watanabe (not to mention Oscar-calibre actresses Juliette Binoche and Sally Hawkins) but this one does get a good deal right. It manages to be respectful of the source material, taking the premise as seriously as possible while serving up lots of large-scale spectacle. Godzilla actually fighting other kaiju(the Massive Unidentified Terrestrial Organisms, or MUTOs)? An Akula-class submarine regurgitated by a MUTO and stranded in the trees? An airport monorail action sequence? That glorious atomic-breath-down-the-MUTO’s-throat bit? Deserving of a celebratory roar in our book.
RUROUNI KENSHIN: TOKYO INERNO

This year, fans of the Rurouni Kenshin manga series were treated to the second and third instalments in the movie adaptation trilogy back-to-back, with Tokyo Infernoreleased in August and The Legend Endsin October. Live-action adaptations of manga and anime haven’t exactly had a sterling track record so the quality of the interpretation with this movie series did delight many fans of the source material. Our writer said “Kyoto Inferno is literally the best of both worlds: the stylised action and rousing storyline of a manga, and the star power and production values of a blockbuster movie.” The historically accurate period details and intricate, tightly-choreographed sword-fighting sequences created with minimal CGI assistance also added to the film’s appeal. Most adaptations of manga and anime are notorious for struggling to present their dense, complex plots to neophytes unfamiliar with the source material, but director Keishi Ohtomo was able to strike an adequate balance. If you’re not into the plot, there’s plenty of action to keep you entertained but if you’re a fan, it certainly caters to you too.
X-MEN: DAYS OF FUTURE PAST

While fans have generally been happy with how things are progressing at Marvel Studios, it’s a different story with the Marvel properties that still reside at other studios, like with Fox’s X-Men series. There’ve been highs (X2: X-Men United, X-Men: First Class) and lows (X-Men: The Last Stand, X-Men Origins: Wolverine) so it is understandable that many were sceptical about X-Men: Days of Future Past. This era-spanning odyssey, taking place simultaneously in a post-apocalyptic future and in 1973, brings together much of the cast from the X-Men trilogy and their younger brethren from First Class. Adapted from the monumental 1981 comic book story arc of the same name, this is a “retroactive continuity” or “retcon” story, in effect wiping the slate clean so we can all move on from some of the spottier entries in the mutant filmography. However, this was a retcon done right, where it wasn’t too convenient or effortless to change everything. We also got Evan Peters as a gleefully scene-stealing Quicksilver, quelling fears of a poor portrayal based on the questionable character design.
SNOWPIERCER

Here’s a movie completely different from your run-of-the-mill action flick. This adaptation of Jacques Lob’s French graphic novel Le Transperceneige owes much of its unique feel to Korean director Bong Joon-ho, who also co-wrote the screenplay with Kelly Masterson. A dystopian sci-fi fable, Snowpiercer is set aboard the eponymous train, perpetually circling an otherwise-uninhabited earth, stuck in a catastrophic ice age. Boasting a unique design sensibility, a talented cast, incisive, sometimes disturbing social commentary and intense, brutal action scenes, Snowpiercer was the “I’ve seen this really cool movie and you should too” flick of choice this summer. U.S. distributors The Weinstein Company insisted on cutting about 20 minutes of footage and adding voiceovers, but Bong refused to compromise. Bong was eventually successful in getting the original, uncut film released and even when the film was restricted to a limited release, the positive response was enough to win it a wider release. If there’s still anyone who thinks Chris Evans is nothing but a pretty boy, this is the movie to point them to.
EDGE OF TOMORROW

It’s a shame Edge of Tomorrow wasn’t a box office champ, because we sure were entertained. Adapted from the Japanese light novel All You Need is Kill by Hiroshi Sakurazaka, the film meshes a Groundhog Day-style time loop with futuristic mech suits, an alien invasion and a D-Day-esque beachhead battle. It also gives us Tom Cruise putting aside some of his ego to amusing effect as a military PR guy with no combat experience plonked into the middle of battle, having to seek out a seasoned warrior played by Emily Blunt to guide him through his predicament and teach him the ropes. The action in this is truly exciting stuff, sufficiently different from the battles with alien invaders taking place in big cities we’ve seen in blockbusters past. It’s also always great to have a badass female character show the guy just how it’s done and while “Emily Blunt” isn’t the name that immediately comes to mind, she sure looked awesome in this movie be it slicing at Mimics with a giant sword forged from a helicopter blade or rising from a downward facing dog yoga position. Top all that off with a hilarious turn from Bill Paxton as a blowhard drill sergeant-type and you’ve got a howling good time.
THE RAID 2: BERANDAL

Action movie junkies went positively nuts over The Raid: Redemption, a badass film in which two SWAT officers face off against an apartment block full of deadly thugs. As such, there were high expectations associated with the sequel, expectations which The Raid 2: Berandal certainly met. It upped the ante when it came to the hyper-violent action spectacle when such a thing seemed impossible given all that happened in the first Raid. Iko Uwais returns as Rama, his opponents this time around including the trio of hired killers comprising “The Assassin”, “Hammer Girl” and her brother “Baseball Bat Man”. The film concludes with a virtuoso kitchen fight which took 10 days to film and comprises 196 shots. In order to shoot the car chase sequence, one of the cameramen was actually disguised as a car seat, passing the camera from the Director of Photography on one side of the car to a camera assistant on the other side to create a seamless shot through the car. Fans of this film are understandably weary of the upcoming Hollywood remake of The Raid, but apparently selling the rights for the remake was how director Gareth Evans was able to fund the sequel.
CAPTAIN AMERICA: THE WINTER SOLDIER


Marvel Studios has just announced their exciting Phase 3 line-up, but let’s take a moment to look back on just how amazing both entries into the Marvel Cinematic Universe in 2014 were. Captain America: The Winter Soldier is adapted from the story arc written by Ed Brubaker (who gets a cameo) in which a figure from Steve Rogers’ past returns in a new form to haunt him. Directors Joe and Anthony Russo set out to create a film which harkens back to the political conspiracy thrillers of the 70s, even managing to rope in Robert Redford. They definitely succeeded, creating a film which had just enough real-world resonance without compromising on the big-budget spectacle. It’s even more impressive considering this is the Russo Brothers’ first big studio action film, going from paintball battles in TV’s Community to super-soldiers duking it out as giant helicarriers fall out of the sky. The events in this film also upend the status-quo for the MCU at large and gave so-so TV series Agents of S.H.I.E.L.D. the kick it needed. We also get introduced to Anthony Mackie as the Falcon, who is the current Captain America in the comics. The special features on the Blu-ray also teach us Mackie’s catchphrase, “Cut the check!” which we cannot stop saying.
GUARDIANS OF THE GALAXY


It’s kind of funny to think of it as such seeing as it’s a $170 million movie from a major studio, but Guardians of the Galaxy has an appealing underdog quality to it. It’s based on more obscure source material than its counterparts in the MCU, its most famous names voice CGI creations, it’s weird and woolly and some feared inaccessible but as it turns out, everyone loves this. Young or old, male or female, tree or raccoon, audiences fell in love with this “bunch of a-holes” in a big way, and at the time of writing, this is the highest-grossing movie of 2014. Director James Gunn crafted a spectacularly entertaining film populated with loveable oddball characters and packed with cosmic adventure, comedy and a heady dose of nostalgia in the form of Star-Lord’s precious mix-tape. Also inspiring was the physical transformation actor Chris Pratt, known for being the schlubby dude from Parks and Recreation, who inspired swoons with his chiselled bod and Han Solo-style roguish charm. There’s also just how genuinely moving this turned out to be; we doubt there’s another film that had you misty-eyed over the bond between a gun-toting raccoon and his tree friend.
DAWN OF THE PLANET OF THE APES
“Apes with guns” – sounds silly, doesn’t it? Well, director Matt Reeves and crew managed to take that and turn it into one of the most intelligent, riveting mainstream films of the year. 2011’s Rise of the Planet of the Apessurprised many moviegoers by being a relevant, superbly-made reboot of the flagging Apes franchise, bringing it back from the misfire that was Tim Burton’s 2001 remake. The sequel skips ahead a decade, with Caesar leading a shrewdness of apes as the human population dwindles. Caesar forms a fragile alliance with the human Malcolm (Jason Clarke), but second-in-command Koba is none too happy about it. The clash of ideologies is presented compellingly, aided in no small measure by the impressive, hyper-realistic visual effects work by WETA Digital. Fox is pushing for Andy Serkis to be considered for a Best Supporting Actor Oscar nomination and if this awards bid is successful, history will be made. There’s no doubting the legitimacy of the performances Serkis, Toby Kebbell and the other performance capture actors turn in. And on top of all that, we get Gary Oldman as the leader of the human survivors! “Apes together strong!”

San Diego Comic-Con International 2014: Postcards from the H

As published in Issue #55 of F*** Magazine 
Here it is: my 8100-word first-hand account of the major movie panels held in Hall H on Saturday. The other panels held in Hall H this day that are not covered in the following article are The Boxtrolls, Sin City: A Dame to Kill For and Entertainment Weekly’s Women Who Kick Ass panel. The article runs long enough as it is and I might save The Boxtrolls and Sin City for closer to when the films are released. The Women Who Kick Ass panel featured actresses exclusively from television shows, and as cool as that panel was, I write for a movie magazine. Starting this article, I thought it would be a fairly quick affair, but with all the transcription involved, I ended up spending 12 straight hours on the first draft alone before getting on the plane. So, really appreciate your reading this article! 

 F1

Text: 
POSTCARDS FROM THE H [San Diego Exclusive]

F*** is at the epicentre of geekdom for Comic-Con’s biggest movie panels.

By Jedd Jong 30/7/14
Photos by Jedd Jong
The air bristles with excitement as thousands mill about, settling into their seats within the cavernous exposition hall. It’s 9:00 am on Saturday at San Diego Comic-Con International, and this means only one thing – those who have waited in line overnight, some from as early as 3:00 pm the previous day, will not be disappointed. Hall H is the Holy of Holies of the geek world. Every year at the convention, those who find themselves huddled in this sanctuary are treated to A-list celebrity appearances, exclusive footage screenings and more than a few exciting surprises. This year, F*** is there to bring you all the latest movie news.
WARNER BROS. PICTURES
First up, Warner Bros. takes over Hall H. “Warner Bros. likes to go big,” states Comic-Con programming director Eddie Ibrahim. On cue, the curtains covering the walls on each side peel back, revealing screens running the length of the massive walls. Moderator Chris Hardwick, dressed as Marty McFly from Back To The Future, runs onstage.
Conspicuously missing from the published schedule of the movies Warner Bros. would be bringing to Hall H was Batman v Superman: Dawn Of Justice. This is clearly the big film on everyone’s mind. So, a half-expected but still very welcome surprise is unleashed upon Hall H, as concept art and animatics for the new DC movie flash across the screens to whoops, yells and gasps. Whoops, yells and gasps are a crucial part of the experience here.
Director Zack Snyder is ushered out by Hardwick. He says that announcing the movie at last year’s Comic-Con feels like it happened “just yesterday” and explains that he has rushed to San Diego after spending the night filming in Detroit. “I couldn’t be happier with the way everything’s going, just super-amazing – the talent, the sets, the special effects and everything is going amazingly well,” Snyder says enthusiastically.

Even though they are still deep in production, Snyder introduces a “teeny little thing” with which to tease the fans. The hall goes dark and the footage rolls. We find ourselves on a rooftop in Gotham City as Batman, clad in heavy armour clearly based off the Dark Knight Returns graphic novel, stands next to a shrouded Bat-signal. Batman yanks the tarp off and the Bat-signal turns on, casting the stout Bat symbol into the cloudy sky. The silhouette dissolves and out of nowhere, Superman appears, arms folded, looking none too happy. His eyes glow red. Batman’s lenses glow blue. The screen goes black and the crowd screams.

At Snyder’s behest, the World’s Finest, Henry Cavill and Ben Affleck, arrive in Hall H to more deafening cheers. They are immediately joined by the woman who makes the World’s Finest the Trinity, Wonder Woman herself, Gal Gadot. The three stars smile and wave but do not sit down or field questions for they would surely be swamped. Unable to contain his own glee, Hardwick snaps a selfie with the Power Trio. “We gotta go back and finish making the movie,” Snyder says as the teaser gets an encore showing.
Jupiter Ascending’s Channing Tatum makes a quick appearance, accompanied by footage from the space opera. The Wachowskis’ sci-fi adventure has been delayed from July this year to February of 2015 and having to follow Batman v Superman must have been at least a little awkward for Tatum. It does seem like it will be stunning in 3D, though. From dazzling alien cityscapes, we journey to a barren future wasteland. Following its own share of delays, Mad Max: Fury Road will finally careen into theatres in 2015 and long-time road warriors are greatly anticipating this one. Charlize Theron cannot be in Hall H as she is filming in South Africa, but she delivers a pre-recorded message. “It just felt like such a brilliant opportunity,” she says of working with director George Miller, before introducing a retrospective supercut of the Mad Max trilogy, also directed by Miller.
It is the first Comic-Con for Miller, something of a legend for creating Max Rockatansky and the post-apo-car-lyptic world he inhabits. The Australian director expresses how overwhelming it is to go from growing up in a small rural town to presenting his film in front of over 6,000 fans. To continue the numbers game, 3,500 storyboards were drawn for the movie which, being light on dialogue, was meticulously plotted in visual form instead of being first written as a screenplay. Miller describes it as one big, long chase and, like the trilogy that came before it, a “Western on wheels” where there is no rule of law and no honour.


“Who knew Mel Gibson would literally turn into Mad Max at one point?” Hardwick asks to nervous laughter and oohs from the crowd. After pausing nervously himself, Miller answers with an explanation that charismatic actors, in addition to having a loveable and accessible side to themselves, also often have an attractive element of danger, something Gibson possesses. Miller asserts that the new Max Rockatansky – Tom Hardy – has got that in him too, comparing watching Hardy at work to watching a “big, wild animal”. Vehicles play a pivotal part in the world of Mad Max – the two rules being that the vehicles couldn’t have advanced electronics as a part of them and had to be robust enough to look like they could weather an apocalypse and make it out the other side.
Following questions from the floor, the teaser for Mad Max: Fury Road rolls for the first time ever. “My name is Max – my world is fire and blood,” goes the voiceover. A shot features coloured smoke explosions filling the dusty air, gorgeously-filmed desolation on full display. Max is shown getting tortured, his back painfully tattooed and his hair shorn off. Imperator Furiosa (Theron), bald with one metal arm, liberates a group of slave women and sits at the wheel of a giant oil tanker war rig. It’s Charlize Theron going the full Sigourney. The clip ends with a snippet of a truly wild chase through a crimson sandstorm, Max hanging on to the outside of a psychotic rogue’s car as his body is blasted with particles. The footage ends, Miller mentions the rollicking score by Junkie XL and Hardwick sings a line of Tina Turner’s We Don’t Need Another Hero from Beyond Thunderdome.

To cap off the Warner Bros. presentation, we travel to Middle Earth. Hardwick leaves and replacing him for this segment is none other than the Laketown Spy himself, Stephen Colbert. Appearing in full costume, Colbert assumes his role as moderator for the panel for The Hobbit: The Battle Of The Five Armies. A life-long Tolkien devotee, Colbert passionately and humorously relates his initial concern for how his beloved books would be adapted and says how his fears were assuaged by the work that Peter Jackson and co. had all done. This eventually led to Colbert beating co-writer Philippa Boyens at a Tolkien trivia contest and later, Colbert, his wife and two sons getting cameo appearances in The Desolation Of Smaug as part of the Laketown spy network. “I hope I have fulfilled Professor Tolkien’s vision”, Colbert jokes about his portrayal.

Following a hysterical blooper compilation from all the previous Hobbitand Lord Of The Rings films, the cast and film-makers take their seats at the long table on the Hall H stage. Director Peter Jackson, co-writer Philippa Boyens, actors Benedict Cumberbatch, Cate Blanchett, Orlando Bloom, Evangeline Lilly, Luke Evans, Lee Pace, Graham McTavish, Elijah Wood and Andy Serkis all emerge to greet the fans who have followed them there and back again. Colbert opens by sincerely thanking Jackson; Jackson apologises on behalf of Martin Freeman, Richard Armitage and Ian McKellen, who are absent due to commitments to theatre and film projects.

Jackson reveals that, in 1995, his first pitch to Miramax was to make a Hobbitfilm first and, if that was successful, to make two Lord Of The Rings movies. “Everything’s changed… it’s an adventure,” Jackson says about the process.

Colbert asks about the evolution of the tone through the three Hobbitfilms. “There is a lot of sadness and tragedy, which is good. It’s always good when you can kill off some of your main characters,” Jackson says with the slightest tinge of George R. R. Martin-esque sadistic glee. He states that the film will leave behind the lighter feel of the first Hobbit movie and approach the tone of The Fellowship Of The Ring.

Cumberbatch is asked to describe the difference between Smaug and Sauron, both of which he portrays. “One’s a dragon…” he begins to laughter. “And one’s an all-seeing non-corporeal entity of evil.” When asked about the performance capture he did for Smaug, Cumberbatch says it was much harder for the others acting against an imaginary Smaug than it was for him in the studio. “I was just throwing myself around a carpeted floor like a lunatic.”
Andy Serkis’ advice? “Just make sure you don’t get carpet burns, really.”
“I’ve often thought that the entire journey is seeking a female dwarf,” McTavish jokes. “It’s nice to be the only representative of my race here today, I feel a little outnumbered by my elven compatriots. It’s been an extraordinary experience being a dwarf when you’re 6’ 3”.”


Cate Blanchett reveals we will see a crack in Galadriel’s serene demeanour this time. “I lose my s***. Elven s***,” the Oscar-winner says.
Colbert chimes in with “I’m sure it sparkles.”
“She gets to kick Sauron’s arse a little in this next film,” Jackson adds.
“I’ve noticed there is a difference in class in Elvendom and Orlando, your father does not want you to date down,” Colbert says regarding the Legolas/Tauriel romance.
“I’m a low-class trash elf, but my s*** still sparkles,” Lilly says.
Bloom says he and Wood were seriously discussing taking up New Zealand citizenship, having been charmed and moved by the real-life Middle Earth.
Colbert asks Wood if he has gone back to read the books after making the films. “Truth be told, I haven’t,” he says to gasps, 6,100 pairs of eyes admonishing him.
“Elijah, do you know how to read?” Colbert deadpans.
Wood says he read The Hobbit as a child but was too daunted to read the LOTR books. “I felt like I was living it in such a profound way that I never really consulted the books,” he rationalises.
Lilly says she treats the stories with such reverence that, until today, she has refused to read the last 25 pages of Return Of The King because “the story must go on.”
Serkis talks about how his life and career have taken an unexpected turn after playing Gollum and then King Kong. “I thought my life was going to go back to normal and I was going to play normal characters in normal films,” he confessed. “I’ve just played a 3.5-foot ring junkie and now I’m going to play a 25-foot gorilla – wow, this means typecasting is no more!” He also acknowledges the artists and technicians at Weta Digital: “They’re the most fantastic, amazing bunch of people to work with.” Colbert flatteringly compares Serkis to Lon Chaney, the famous classic monster movie actor who would transform into various iconic movie monsters with elaborate make-up.
Then, the teaser trailer is screened. “One day, they’ll remember everything that happened – the good, the bad, those of who lived and those who did not,” goes Bilbo’s voiceover. The haunting A Walking Song/The Edge of Night plays in the background as we are greeted with stunning Peter Jackson vista after stunning Peter Jackson vista.
“Will you have peace or war?!” Bard the Bowman challenges.
“I will have war,” Thorin replies.
After the footage ends, Colbert says, “Thank you for not giving away the part where the leader of the spy network saves the day.”
When the discussion turns to props and make-up, Lilly offers, “I know how sexy a big pointy ear can be.”

If you’ve always wanted to hear Smaug say “button lady”, that’s what happened in Hall H when Cumberbatch obliged a request during Q and A from a fan whose outfit was covered in collectible LOTR and Hobbit buttons. She asks if Bard or Legolas is the better archer.
“Both of these guys are really good at archery in real life,” Lilly says. “They’re both thinking ‘How do I tell them that I’m the best? This guy’s okay but I’m better!’”
Bloom throws down the gauntlet, saying of Evans, “He’s got longer arrows and a bigger bow, but I’m the better shot.”
A fan dressed as a gender-flipped Thor asks about the technical aspects of acting opposite nothing, and all eyes on the panel immediately turn towards Serkis. “All you need is the eyes of another actor to look into,” Serkis says. “It’s about embodying the character in a very normal way, even though all you’re wearing is a spandex suit. The ability to lose yourself in a world, to lose yourself in a character, to bury yourself in a part so deep that you believe that you’re that person.”
Blanchett speaks about the lengths Jackson, Boyens and Fran Walsh would go to in order to ensure their actors had as clear an idea of their later-to-be-enhanced scenes as possible. “They’d show you pictures, drawings, plates they’d already shot, the atmosphere you were in.” As an actor whose background is in the theatre, Blanchett says the process is akin to “doing Chekhov…with prosthetic ears”.
Another member of the audience asks the cast where they would take their characters if they came to Comic-Con. “Hall H,” Cumberbatch replies to cheers. “I don’t think he could fit in here, it would be a bit of a squeeze.” This writer immediately imagines a contented, geeky Smaug atop a massive pile of posters, comics, toys, shirts and other assorted Comic-Con swag.

Serkis breaks out his Gollum voice, which we all absolutely go nuts for. “Well, my secret dream, precious/yes, what is it?/I would like to go backstage with Stephen Col-bert and see what he’s got inside his costume, precious!”

The panel concludes with the announcement of an exclusive giveaway in which 75 fans will win a trip to New Zealand, courtesy of Warner Bros. and Air New Zealand. 2 out of the 75 names are announced, the overjoyed winners giddily running to the front of the hall to discuss their holiday plans with a Warner Bros. representative.
LEGENDARY PICTURES

Following Warner Bros. in Hall H is the studio with whom they were formerly distribution partners. Legendary has moved on to teaming up with Universal and is fresh off the monster hit Godzilla. Moderator Jessica Chobot introduces studio chief Thomas Tull, who has Thunderstruck as his entrance theme. “Right here, several years ago in Hall H, is where we kicked off the campaign to bring the King of the Monsters, Godzilla, back.” Tull apologises on behalf of director Gareth Edwards, who is “locked up in a galaxy far, far away” and thus cannot be at Comic-Con. We do get a video message from Edwards, though.


In the footage, the director stands in front of the Golden Gate Bridge in San Francisco. “Due to the destruction caused by Godzilla, Thomas has forced me to personally come up here to supervise the rebuilding of the city,” he explains. Thanking the supporters at Comic-Con, Edwards announces he will make a sequel, but not before taking “a break from all the fanboy opinions” by doing a “small little sci-fi movie… I can officially confirm the creatures that will feature in that movie will be –” The names are bleeped out as the audience groans and chuckles. Fighter jets swoosh overhead in San Francisco. “You’ve got to keep them on the island, I’m not rebuilding this again, seriously!” Edwards says, exasperated. Edwards also appears annoyed with his leading man – make that monster. “He roars and roars like he’s something special, I’m like ‘Get over yourself, you’re not Bryan Cranston!’” Let’s see Godzilla get more roles in Hollywood after that!

Tull announces that he has been able to “pry some classified footage away from Monarch”. The footage reveals that other threats have been discovered beyond Godzilla and the MUTOs. Blurry, grainy shots of three monsters are shown. Their codenames: Rodan, Mothra and King Ghidorah. Applause and cheers. The text “CONFLICT INEVITABLE” appears on the screen, followed by “LET THEM FIGHT”.

Tull says that Legendary has been given permission by the owners of Godzillato widen the playing field. “Toho’s been great to us and now we have more monsters to play with,” he says, and ends with thanks to Comic-Con and a promise of footage for next year’s panel.

Next up, we plunge deep beneath the streets of Paris for the found-footage horror adventure As Above, So Below. In the trailer we are shown, urban archaeology student Scarlet Marlowe leads an ill-advised expedition into the winding catacombs of Paris, in which her team discovers a terrifying, infernal secret. The Dowdle brothers take the stage, John directing and Drew producing, with both writing the script together. They explain that the 200 miles of twisting, hellish tunnels – six storeys underground in pitch darkness, dating back to the 14th century – make for an ideal fright flick setting. “We’ve always wanted to do a found-footage, Indiana Jones-type story and we found the Paris Catacombs would be the perfect place for that kind of epic adventure done in a personal style.” As Above, So Below is the first film given permission to shoot in the off-limits areas of the Catacombs.


Making his Comic-Con debut is renowned director Michael Mann of The Last Of The Mohicans, Thief, Heat and Collateral fame. Lending some insight into his process, Mann says that he meets with professional thieves and other real criminals for research excursions in order to make his crime dramas as authentic as possible. Today, he’s here to talk about his techno-thriller Blackhat, starring Chris Hemsworth as an expert hacker coerced into helping the government tackle a cyber-terror threat.


Having just returned from Indonesia and Singapore, Mann wanted to make a film about cyber-crime set in Asia. At the time the film was conceived, the Stuxnet worm crisis that sabotaged the Natanz nuclear facility in Iran had just unfolded. The film was shot in Hong Kong, Jakarta and Kuala Lumpur in addition to Los Angeles. Having spent time with actual black-hat hackers, Mann says that, after 7-8 straight hours of coding, they “zone into it” and the experience provides a “pleasurable, opiating feedback loop”. It is escapism, but escapism that has impact in the physical world.
Mann brings out a teaser trailer, the first-ever look anyone has had at Blackhat. A nuclear power plant meltdown caused by an attack on the computer infrastructure is depicted. “This isn’t about money,” an ominous voiceover intones. “This isn’t about politics. I can target anything, anyone, anywhere.” The last resort for the government agencies investigating this crime is to engage the services of black-hat hacker Nick Hathaway, serving time in federal prison for committing four crimes and incurring $4,600 in damages. He asks to have his sentence commuted.

“This isn’t a negotiation,” a fed tells him.

“I just made it one,” Hathaway fires back.

The footage features Hollywood stars Hemsworth, Viola Davis and Holt McCallany alongside Asian actors Wang Leehom and Tang Wei. We get a few glimpses of some steamy moments between Tang and the computer-savvy Thunder God. Then, Hemsworth himself is invited out by his director to squeals of delight. “He’s so pretty,” swoons a woman seated behind this writer.

Hemsworth says that several films Mann has directed rank among his favourites, and that “nobody does precision and detail like him.” He also confesses that he was intimidated by Mann, but that he admires the amount of research that goes into making his films. “We went to a number of prisons to meet the criminals.” Mann outlines Hemsworth’s character in the film as a blue-collar steel mill worker who is granted a scholarship to MIT and falls into cyber-crime.

“We did 74 scenes in 4 countries in 66 days,” Mann says of the hectic shooting schedule. He also describes his star as not just a talented actor whose career is only just beginning, but “a terrific guy and a real regular fella”.


In the age of Wikileaks and Edward Snowden, Blackhatfeels ripped from the headlines. Mann shares that the cast and crew landed in Hong Kong one day before the Snowden story broke. In preparation for his role, Hemsworth studied coding under mathematician Chris McKinlay. “All of a sudden, you realise how vulnerable you are, what you think is safe, information you think secret…” Hemsworth says that a professional told him that, these days, it truly is that easy for someone in the know to gain access to almost anybody’s personal information. Colour us truly paranoid! One hopes that with this training, the hacking featured in the film will be more realistic and less Swordfish-y (hey, that one had as its hacker protagonist a hunk who also plays a Marvel superhero!).

We trek from the contemporary personal cyber-security concerns of our times to the lush Victorian Gothic horror of Crimson Peak, which marks director Guillermo del Toro’s return to a genre he has greatly impacted with his earlier films. Del Toro is a Comic-Con favourite and was greeted with waves of applause. Del Toro explains that, after the tough shooting experience on Mimic, he decided that his painterly horror films would be reserved for his Spanish-language work and that he would direct big popcorn blockbusters in English. However, that changed after Pacific Rim, when Legendary and Universal told del Toro that he had the freedom to make an English-language Gothic horror-romance the way he wanted.


Urging the audience to visit the Legendary booth on the convention floor, del Toro endorses the Crimson Peak walk-through attraction and the popular Pacific Rim Oculus Rift virtual reality experience. “It’s f**king awesome!” he says excitedly. It seems that seeing the “no swearing” advisory on the back of his name card on the table has caused the director to turn rebellious. “We are a year and a half from releasing the movie but nevertheless I wanted to bring you a little bit of a look of the film,” and promised that there would be even more next year.



“I must tell you girls, Tom Hiddleston, for me, is the nicest f**king guy!” he says of Crimson Peak’s leading man to the expected squeals. “It used to be that either you were nice [and ugly], or you were good-looking and an a**hole… this guy ruins everything!”

The footage is gorgeous. It’s an over-used adjective but it fits. Thomas Sharpe (Hiddleston), in voiceover, describes the titular mansion as a living thing, with “timber for bones and windows for eyes”. As the ghostly manifestations begin, the voice continues, “We hold on to things – some are good, some are bad, some should never be spoken of again.” Imagine American Horror Story but through Guillermo del Toro’s eyes. Now, doesn’t that just sound like heaven for fans of well-made horror that is as beautiful and seductive as it is truly frightening?

“The colours are amazing!” Chobot exclaims. Del Toro tells us that it was a labour of love building an entire three-storey-high Victorian mansion from scratch on a soundstage, every last carving or relief lovingly hand-crafted by artisan set-builders and decorators.

“We spent the better part of a year designing the film and then built everything to the ultimate detail,” del Toro continues. “I wanted the freedom to create a great adult story for a female lead.” This pleases all the women in Hall H, as well as many men who have wanted to see women in leading roles in genre films. Mia Wasikowska will be playing the female lead, Edith Cushing. While there will be a romantic angle, del Toro wants to “see her live past all that. Past getting the guy, okay? F*** that s***!” He promises a romantic aspect but also a thriller one, beautiful moments juxtaposed with “very brutal, very brutal” moments. “We have scary ghosts, but even scarier people.”

“I know we don’t have time for Q&A, but I love the f***ing Q&A,” del Toro says, turning to the audience, preparing to ask two questions to the crowd gathered before him. “Here we go… I have two things to ask from you and you need to react.”

“Number One: Hellboy 3?”

And react we do, for a good long while.

At TheMountains Of Madness?”

More reactions. Del Toro is known as much for his imaginative movies as for constantly having too much on his plate and that he is entertaining the thought of returning to these long-anticipated projects sends Hall H into a frenzy.

Following Crimson Peak is a fantasy flick of a very different stripe: Duncan Jones’ Warcraft. Bowie Jr. himself, clad in a Lunar Industries t-shirt (referencing his earlier film Moon), sits at the table on stage. “I just got a hug from Guillermo del Toro, so I’m feeling pretty good,” he says. Chobot asks if he feels pressure, seeing as the game franchise has millions and millions of fans. “It’s 20 years of storytelling, so there’s a lot of stuff to draw on,” he says, focusing on the possibilities instead of the pressure.


So, how is Jones going to appeal to long-time fans of the Blizzard games while making the film accessible enough for neophytes? “A lot of films want to make origin stories but I think, in this case, it really merits an origin story. We want to show how the world of Azeroth falls into conflict between Orcs and humans.” Jones asserts that those unfamiliar with the games will also be able to enjoy his Warcraft movie, pointing to Comic-Con as a great example of people “getting into” new properties and series – and he’s seeking to make converts out of filmgoers when Warcraft comes out in March 2016. “There are a lot of people who haven’t played the game that I think we can bring in through the film.”

Jones says he is happy that Blizzard Entertainment, who has wanted a World Of Warcraft film for the longest time, will be getting their wish and that he is extremely lucky to be working with Legendary Pictures on the project. “We were trying to bring the set-building and world-building of the Lord Of The Rings and the technology of Avatar, and it really was like trying to make those two movies. It’s a big project and I think it deserves it and hopefully the final result will speak for itself.”

At last year’s Con, Jones brought a teaser trailer prepared before any of the shooting even began. Now, two months after principal photography has wrapped, he has more. The teaser trailer begins. That signature fantasy movie “one-woman wail” is audible. “I spent more time protecting my king than my own son,” a grizzled voice says in the voiceover as we see typical fantasy movie spectacle (knights, armour, horses, magic etc). “Does that make me loyal, or a fool? I’ve led thousands of warriors into battle and I fear being a father,” he continues. “Does that make me a leader, or a coward?” As we glimpse some of the epic battle scenes, the voice concludes. “Is war the only way?”

The panel concludes with Thomas Tull returning to the stage, thanking the fans present. “You’re here, which is why we bring special stuff here.” He has something to add: “My Mexican brother Guillermo posed a question, and the only thing I can say is ‘When you’re done with Pac Rim 2, we’ll talk’.” Thrilled that Hellboy 3 and At The Mountains Of Madnessmight be on the horizon, no matter how distant said horizon might be, the hall falls silent. No, of course we didn’t!


That would’ve been plenty from the studio, but Tull has one last trick up his sleeve, something the studio has been “tinkering around” with. Without any other introduction, the footage rolls. The camera sweeps across a tumultuous tossing sea, a storm raging. “The long stretches of the waterway ran out, cut off forever from everything you had known,” goes a weary voiceover. “It was like travelling back to the earliest beginnings of the world.” A misty island is revealed and the camera makes landfall. “When vegetation writhed throughout the earth, the big trees were kings.” In the jungle, a sea monster swims through a lake and monkeys swing through the treetops. Everyone in the room is working at figuring out just what this is. “Its very existence was improbable,” the voice continues. We see a craggy cliff face resembling a giant skull. “Being alone in the wilderness, we had gone mad… we penetrated deeper and deeper into the heart of darkness.” The camera stops at a range of trees, rustling with loud thumping in the background, something getting closer and closer. An unmistakable giant gorilla bursts through the canopy, thumping his chest. The title card – “LEGENDARY’S SKULL ISLAND”. Now, the possibility of King Kong and Godzilla having a rematch just seems that much more within reach.

MARVEL STUDIOS

The last movie-related panel for the day before a TV showcase later that night is undoubtedly the one for which many waiting in line overnight were the most excited. After all, at last year’s Marvel Studios panel, Tom Hiddleston stormed the stage in full Loki regalia, basking in the adoration of his Hall H “army”. The panel is running 15 minutes late and we are antsy.

Before anything happens though, a supercut assembled especially for Hall H plays, taking a fond look back at all the Marvel Cinematic Universe movies. Fans cheer when they see their favourite heroes on screen. Everyone gets a squeal – Iron Man, Thor, Captain America, the Incredible Hulk, Nick Fury, Black Widow, Loki… even Hawkeye. It’s capped off with snippets from Guardians Of The Galaxy, at the time of writing mere days away from its worldwide release. It’s just mind-boggling to think how far the studio has come, and how quickly they’ve been able to do so. Exciting times!

Hardwick returns to the stage and promises that the hour or so ahead will be “well worth the wait”.
He brings out Marvel Studios head honcho Kevin Feige, hyping Guardians of the Galaxy, the studio’s tenth film. “It always starts with you guys in this room,” Feige says, as the audience lets him know we appreciate his acknowledgement. Feige says he loves the notion that movie-goers are just as excited for the sequels as they are for all-new Marvel movies. Releasing one sequel and one new movie each year seems to be the plan going forward. “What we’re talking about today is 2015. We’re doing a very similar thing, we have a movie called Avengers: Age Of Ultron coming out and then we have something new – Ant-Man is finally coming out. You want to meet some people involved in Ant-Man?” Of course we do, particularly since the troubled production (original director Edgar Wright was controversially let go) has led fans to require some reassurance.

Replacement director Peyton Reed and stars Paul Rudd, Michael Douglas, Corey Stoll and Evangeline Lilly walk onstage to massive applause. Lilly’s appearance at the panel confirms long-swirling rumours that she will play Hope Van Dyne, the daughter of Hank Pym. In an attempt to quell fears that Reed is not the right director for the job, Hardwick asks him how many years he’s been attending Comic-Con. Reed replies that this is his 20thtime at the convention. He also reveals that, when he was a drummer for his punk band Johnny Quest back in the day, one of the fliers he had drawn to promote the band was an homage to the cover of Avengers #1 – and it turns out that Reed had drawn himself, flying on tiny drums, as Ant-Man.
It is the first Comic-Con for both Ant-Men, the discussion turning to Comic-Con virginity (this writer would say ‘Oh the irony’, but that would be hypocritical) and “popping cherries”. “I am popping my Comic-Con cherry and it is as advertised,” Rudd says.

“I’ve popped enough cherries,” Douglas adds, playing up his reputation as a bit of a Lothario.
“Don’t think I don’t want to just talk about that for the next hour,” cracks Hardwick.
“It’s a mind-bender, it’s so exciting… it’s kind of tough to wrap my brain around. I’ve been doing this as a job for a while but this is a whole other thing! I’m excited by the challenges and I’m looking forward to working with great people and seeing how it all is,” Rudd says.

“I’ve always looked at Marvel movies from afar with tremendous envy,” Douglas says, explaining that, as he has not done many films with a touch of the fantastical in them, he was excited to be a part of a sci-fi action comedy like Ant-Man. Douglas sums up the premise, describing his character Dr. Hank Pym, an entomologist and metallurgist (he struggles with the word) who has developed a serum with which to shrink a human being to the size of an ant, while retaining the strength of a regular-sized person. The goal is also to communicate with ants. Pym’s partner, played by Corey Stoll, has taken the company “in a different, evil direction” and Pym has found a protégé in Paul Rudd’s Scott Lang. He mentions the incredible shape Rudd is in, to a few squeals.

“We’re the first Marvel movie that’s spending a lot of money on CGI to removemuscles,” Reed jokes.
 

“My experience so far has been evading questions about Ant-Man,” Lilly says, happy to be able to break her silence on her involvement in the film. Lilly has had a hectic last six months, between being a mother, producing her children’s book series and working on the Hobbitfilms. She reveals that she actually has taken up meditative breathing just so she can go to sleep. “I’m having a great time! Con is kind of my world; it kind of seems that everything I’ve done on the screen, you guys are in the fray,” she tells the fans. She remembers being in Hall H to screen footage from Lost, a television series that hadn’t even begun airing. “Much love to all of you, my people!” she says, returning the adulation.


Hardwick asks Corey Stoll to describe his character Darren Cross, the antagonist of the piece who takes on the super-villain identity Yellowjacket. “I’m a scientist as well and I have now taken over the company. Some very judgemental people may think it’s in an ‘evil’ direction, but I think I’m just taking it into the future.” Obtaining some Pym particles and putting on the Yellowjacket suit, Cross is able to give Ant-Man a run for his money, causing some serious trouble for our heroes.

On how the cast must stay mum about details of the film until Comic-Con, Hardwick says, “So Comic-Con must be an incredible release for you.”

“Popping cherries, release, this is a family panel!” Rudd protests.

“That’s how families get made!” Hardwick fires back to laughter.

They’ve not even started principal photography, which is still 2 weeks away. “We haven’t started filming the movie yet, but we filmed a little something…” Feige says.  The footage begins; we move through Hank Pym’s lab, hearing his voice and Scott Lang’s but not seeing anybody. Lang protests to Pym that he is not a superhero.

“Which means that you’re not an egomaniac and you’re not an undisciplined moron!” Dr. Pym snaps back. “Causing more destruction than he stops. Superheroes? What a goddamn joke. You, you’re different. You’re doing this because it’s the right thing to do.” Scott voices his doubts. “Jesus Christ! I think somebody already shrunk your balls!” Pym says bluntly. “Don’t worry, Scott. It’s a smalljob.”

We then cut to a rooftop where a shrunken-down Lang in his Ant-Man costume is running to the ledge of the building, either in pursuit or being pursued. He struggles to mount his steed – an actual wasp. The helmet is not working and thus is not communicating his thoughts to the wasp effectively. He leaps and catches the wasp as it flies away, pulling himself onto its back. “It’s okay, I got this,” he says as the footage ends.

No offence to Ant-Man, but the Marvel flick everyone is here for is Avengers: Age Of Ultron. Feige apologises on Joss Whedon’s behalf; the writer-director of the giant sequel cannot be at the Con because he is laid up in hospital in London, following serious knee surgery. Feige asks that we offer our well wishes over Twitter. “Look at the photos he’s put up, it’s very pathetic, it’s very sad,” he says. “But, we do have some other people.” Now, that’s under-selling done right.

Michael Jackson’s Don’t Stop ‘Til You Get Enough plays as the entrance theme for our Avengers (and their adversaries). The first to stride onto the Hall H stage is Robert Downey Jr., dressed as Tony Stark and carrying a metallic briefcase. He opens it up, it is filled with roses which he tosses into the audience, after which he does a big dramatic bow. Jeremy Renner, Mark  Ruffalo, Chris Hemsworth, Cobie Smulders, Samuel L. Jackson, Chris Evans, Paul Bettany and new additions James Spader, Aaron Taylor-Johnson and Elizabeth Olsen walk out, an epic gathering of heroes and villains and those in-between if ever there was one.
“This is good, this is what’s supposed to happen,” Hardwick says, giving voice to all our thoughts.
“It just keeps getting better,” Downey Jr. says. “This is the longest bench of talent I’ve ever been a part of and we’ve got a real nice movie for you guys next year.” On Iron Man’s role in the continuing Marvel saga, Downey Jr. Says, “I’ve become a little less significant each time, which is just fine because they’re all so damn good!”



“It’s always thrilling, man… glad to be here, very honoured,” says Renner. “Meeting this guy over here,” Renner says pointing to Downey Jr., “He’s the one who convinced me and washed my car in a thong… I have pictures, I’m Instagramming that s***.” Renner says that, while he never imagined he’d play a superhero, he could not be more grateful for it.

Hardwick says that, when Ruffalo first made a Comic-Con appearance for the first Avengersfilm, he was bewildered by how the crazy Con machine works but it appears that, since then, he has truly embraced his role as the not-so-jolly Green Giant and that Green Giant’s fans. “They don’t treat me like this at home, that’s for sure,” he chuckles. This causes the audience to whoop and cheer for him even more. “That’s really nice…” he says.

The crowd chants “Hulk, Hulk, Hulk!”
“No, don’t get him excited, that’s when it gets bad!” Hardwick warns. “Keep his pulse rate down!”

On gaining recognition since becoming an Avenger, Ruffalo says, “People don’t even know who I am other than Hulk.” When people on the street shout “Hulk, Hulk!” at him, he says his response is to say “The name’s Banner”.

“You are in exceptionally good shape,” Hardwick says, in awe of Chris Hemsworth’s physique. “That arm is the size of my torso!”  The girls squeal. “What has Thor meant to you all this time?” Hardwick asks.
“Best experience that I’ve had on the set, off the set, to work with this group of people to bring this character to life and to be part of this madness…” On the subject of what he would like to do as Thor that the character hasn’t had a chance to do yet in the films, Hemsworth says, without missing a beat, “turning into a woman”, in reference to the recent explosive announcement that the new Thor in the comics will indeed be female. “I don’t want to speak too early and jinx it, but I think it could be my Oscar,” he says.
“Naw, he’s got that purdy girl hair, he’s gonna be fine,” drawls Hardwick.


Smulders says it was fun getting to do a signing and connecting with fans, if only for a moment. Did she think Maria Hill would recur in this world as often as she does? “I had hoped! Joss is the one who brought me into this world, we just keep going on films and on TV and I’m so grateful,” she says, hinting that we might just see more of ex-Agent Hill in the new season of Marvel’s Agents Of S.H.I.E.L.D.


On the eye-patch messing with his depth perception, Jackson says, “I was smart enough to figure that out… I’ve got that down pat, cancel the insurance!” Speaking about the reception he always receives at the Con, Jackson says “Comic-Con is phenomenal, it’s totally amazing… I’ve been coming here since Episode I of Star Wars. Seems like every year I come here and feel like I belong, I get validated with all the love and energy from you guys and it just makes me feel like doing more! We make the movies because we want to entertain you guys and I make movies because I want to see myself in them!”

Next, the Star-Spangled Man himself. Apparently, the two Chris-es compare muscles. “It’s very difficult to stand next to him [Hemsworth],” Evans concedes. “Magic, CGI, stuntmen,” Evans says, downplaying the effort it takes for him to get into super-soldier shape. So, having been in the modern world for a while now, is Steve Rogers totally settled in? “He’s not just amazed at cell phones and the Internet, he’s up to speed, but I think he’s looking for a place to belong.” Following the collapse of S.H.I.E.L.D., Rogers, used to following orders all his life, has to re-evaluate his place in the world. “He’s looking for home,” Evans says.

Aaron Taylor-Johnson finds being a part of the established Marvel Cinematic Universe “overwhelming and surreal”, and is grateful to have been chosen by Whedon for the part. “What Joss did in the first one seemed like a mission completely impossible to do, that everyone had their moment… he has that tone when you can have a journey, be emotional and sad at moments and be light-hearted and action-packed.” He notes that he thoroughly enjoys working on Marvel movies – and that there will presumably be many more to come.

InAvengers: Age of Ultron, Paul Bettany steps out of the recording booth to play Vision. “They’re making me work for my money,” he jokes. “I used to turn up for 45 minutes in a dark room and get a bag of cash. Now I have to work.” He says that his kids are absolutely excited, and that, prior to his playing Vision, “they had no interest in what I did”. He is pretty impressed that his children were able to keep his casting as Vision secret for a year and a half.

“That you know of,” Hardwick adds.

The big bad of the piece, Ultron himself a.k.a. James Spader, has done Comic-Con last year for the TV series The Blacklist. “I’ve always thought my whole life that life could never get weird or crazy enough for me and I’ve got to tell you one thing – this place may be the craziest, weirdest place!”

“You should now pat yourselves on the back everyone, that you are part of James Spader’s weird fever dreams,” Hardwick jokes.

“I’m playing an 8-foot robot in this movie,” Spader says about Ultron. “I’ve always played humans and shooting this film was as startling and surprising and challenging and exciting as coming here, truthfully, for the first time. Doing this film, everything was so entirely new”. He sums up his experience as just “unimaginably exciting”.

Elizabeth Olsen is last but certainly not least to speak on the panel. “What a list of people to follow, it doesn’t feel that great,” she says. Though she was at first intimidated by her potential colleagues, she says everyone was very welcoming. “It’s fun to bring a new element to the game, there’s now magic, there’s mutant – mutated people…”


Oops! The 6,100-strong crowd certainly caught that slip-up. Let’s hope nobody from Fox is at the panel!
“I think it ends up adding something kind of epic to the fights,” Olsen says of the introduction of magic into the Marvel Cinematic Universe. “I practise daily just staring at a pencil and trying to get it to move,” she jokes. “You should see it, it’s like flying, I’m nailing it!”

At this point, Robert Downey Jr. chimes in. “She actually cast a spell on me two weeks ago and hopefully before this is all done, she’ll relieve me. It burns!” The audience gives that kind of laugh you give when you hear a dirty joke. “It could mean anything!” Downey Jr. puts his hands up in the air mock-defensively.
Due to her pregnancy, Scarlett Johansson can’t be here, but sends a video message. “Hey guys, I don’t mean to cramp your style but we’re kind of running out of time here. Hey Kev, you wanna be a doll and roll us that video footage?”

Oh yes. The first look at Avengers: Age Of Ultron.

We open during a party at Avengers tower. Thor puts Mjolnir down on the coffee table. Clint Barton is dismissive of the notion that only Thor can lift the hammer. “Whatever, man, it’s a circus sideshow, a party trick.” This leads everyone to try their hand. Tony Stark goes first.

“If I lift it, do I get to rule Asgard?” he asks. Thor says yes. When Tony is unsuccessful, he enlists the help of James Rhodes – both now wearing their armoured power gauntlets. Still no luck. Even Cap can’t manage.

Thor asks if Natasha would like to try. She declines, saying, “That’s not a question you want answered.”
Tony postulates that it’s some kind of biometric identification system. “Whosoever carries Thor’s fingerprints is, I think, the literal translation?”

Thor has a simpler answer: “You’re not worthy.”

It’s all fun and games until Ultron crashes the party. “How could you be worthy?” the robot asks in a menacing metallic voice. “You’re all killers. You want to protect the world but you don’t want to change. There’s only one path to peace – extinction.”

We then segue into the teaser trailer. “I had a vision,” Ultron says in voiceover. “The whole world screaming for mercy.” We see scenes of the expected superhero mayhem, the highlight of which is a clash between the Hulk and Iron Man in his robust Hulkbuster armour. We also glimpse Quicksilver and Scarlet Witch’s powers in action as a chillingly creepy remix of I’ve Got No Strings from Pinocchioplays in the background. Another key visual is Captain America’s shield, shattered.

“It’s the end,” Tony says. “The end of the path I started us on.”

“Nothing lasts forever,” Natasha agrees.

At the end of the trailer, Ultron intones, “There are no strings on me.”

Gepetto sure had it easier than Tony Stark.

Hardwick wonders aloud how Marvel will top Ultron in the bad guy stakes.

On cue, Josh Brolin, his left hand covered in a toy Infinity Gauntlet, emerges, jumping on the table and punching the air with his bejewelled fist. Brolin will provide the voice and performance capture for the dastardly intergalactic warlord Thanos, who will appear in Guardians Of The Galaxy before he ever tangles with the Avengers. “Where’s my rose?!” Brolin demands. As RDJ hands him one, Brolin stuffs it into his mouth, sending petals flying.



We’re already all giddy, but there’s one last thing: a video message from Chris Pratt and James Gunn, star and director respectively of Guardians Of The Galaxy. The conceit of this clip is that they aren’t aware that the camera is already rolling and are discussing what they should say to the Hall H audience. Gunn broaches the subject of announcing a sequel. “Too bad we don’t have the balls,” he sighs as the screen cuts to the GotG logo. Over the top is scrawled, chalk-like, the number “2”. Beneath it is the release date – July 28 2017. Early word of mouth for Guardians has been overwhelmingly positive, so it is no surprise a sequel would be coming – though the way in which it is announced is certainly amusing.

And that’s our day in Hall H. We hope that through these 8000+ words, it feels like you, dear reader, were there too. 

Godzilla (2014)

For F*** Magazine

GODZILLA

Director : Gareth Edwards
Cast : Aaron Taylor-Johnson, Ken Watanabe, Elizabeth Olsen, Bryan Cranston, Juliette Binoche, Sally Hawkins, David Strathairn
Genre : Action, Sci-fi
Opens: : 15 May 2014
Rating : PG (Some Intense Sequences)

It has been ten years since Godzilla: Final Wars, and the King of Monsters has returned to reclaim his rubble-built throne in this film. Lt. Ford Brody (Taylor-Johnson) is an explosive ordnance disposal technician, who has a young son (Carlson Bode) with his wife, nurse Elle (Olsen). As a child, Ford lived in Japan, where his parents Joe (Cranston) and Sandy (Binoche) were supervisors at a nuclear power plant. A catastrophic incident in which the power plant was attacked by a Massive Unidentified Terrestrial Organism, or MUTO, still haunts Ford. 15 years later, the MUTO has re-emerged and as the military scrambles to fight it, scientist Dr. Ichiro Serizawa (Watanabe) believes only one thing can truly stop it: the powerful ancient creature known as Godzilla – but not without causing its share of damage.

The release of this Godzilla film marks Big G’s 60th anniversary; the creature has appeared in a staggering 30 official films (including this one) since 1954. The original film was a serious-minded one but over time, it’s become harder and harder to take the creation seriously, the iconic kaiju sometimes regarded as camp and mostly viewed as a friendly mascot (look for “Godzilla happy dance” on YouTube). Director Gareth Edwards, who became an overnight sensation with his micro-budget creature feature Monsters in 2010, has delivered an incarnation of the monster that can indeed be taken seriously. With Godzilla, the creature’s second proper Hollywood outing, Edwards has crafted an effective disaster movie which possesses admirable scope and scale. In an age where moviegoers are difficult to impress, this is pretty darn impressive. The sheer amount of visual effects work and the number of major action set-pieces in this one film is hard to wrap one’s head around and yet, it’s not overwhelming or repetitive. 

We’ll be upfront about it: the plot isn’t Godzilla’s strongest point. The protagonist is little more than “the soldier” and his wife is merely “the nurse”. There are more than a handful of contrivances which repeatedly position Ford Brody in the middle of the action and he must be followed around by the same guardian angel who was looking out for Brad Pitt’s Gerry Lane in World War Z, seeing how he survives multiple catastrophes with nary a scratch. Seeing the future Scarlet Witch and Quicksilver as a married couple might gross some of the geekier audience members out a tad. However, there are definitely things about the narrative that work: it’s couched as a conspiracy thriller of sorts and the downright terrific opening credits are presented as a montage of Godzilla’s appearances throughout history, which the relevant authorities have tried to conceal from the public. Even though the military plays a pivotal role, Godzilla does not come off as jingoistic.
In addition to essentially being a scaled-up take on Monsters, Godzilla also takes a handful of pages from Steven Spielberg’s playbook. The late reveal of the titular monster (it’s approximately an hour in before Godzilla shows up proper) echoes Jaws, as does the surname “Brody”. The post-9/11 disaster movie feel is reminiscent of War of the Worlds. The daddy issues are present in many of Spielberg’s works. The father who grows obsessed with an outré subject is from Close Encounters of the Third Kind. And of course, there’s the Jurassic Park connection, not just with the giant creatures running amok but also in scenes like a helicopter approaching a jungle. But while Roland Emmerich’s Godzilla was an unsuccessful Jurassic Park rip-off, the above influences enrich Edwards’ work and do not stick out as being “stolen”. 

As of late, we’ve heard complaints of blockbusters being stuffed with too much wanton destruction, to the extent that scenes of major cities being levelled no longer carry any weight. Here, there is calamity with consequence; Edwards striking a difficult balance between the visceral thrill of seeing giant monsters punch each other and the solemnity of witnessing cities laid to waste and countless lives destroyed. Japanese fans have complained that Godzilla appears to have become the Burger King of all Monsters, having packed on the tons. Yes, Godzilla does seem a little pudgier here, but his presence is no less awe-inspiring and in spite of the extra weight and relatively small head, nothing seems very “off” about his look here. The character animation on Godzilla and his MUTO opponents is excellent; the creatures end up being great “actors” thanks to the emotion the visual effects artists imbue their facial expressions with. There’s also just enough of a nod in their movements to the heyday of men in rubber suits shoving each other about a model city without coming off as silly.  

Despite the cast not being the main draw, nobody in Godzilla is terrible. Taylor-Johnson borders on wooden but still brings a humanity to Brody, though at 23, he does seem a little young to be the father of a five-year-old. We do wish Elizabeth Olsen had more to do; she isn’t in the thick of the action for most of the film. Bryan Cranston is good as the troubled, slightly manic dad, though he isn’t in the film as much as the trailers would lead you to believe, playing more of a supporting role. Ken Watanabe is perfectly respectable, but he does constantly look worried/constipated. Sally Hawkins, in her first big-budget blockbuster, doesn’t have much to do either as his assistant. David Strathairn is the standard military type here but thankfully, isn’t characterized as ridiculously hard-nosed.
While the “human element” might be lacking somewhat, there is more than enough in Godzilla to get emotionally invested in and thanks to Edwards’ vision, this does stand above the loud, noisy blockbuster pack. The high-altitude low-opening parachute jump scene towards the film’s climax is gorgeously shot by cinematographer Seamus McGarvey, a moment of calm in the midst of the storm. For the most part though, the 3D effects are not sufficiently noticeable. The spectacle is massive but not numbing and the film takes itself just seriously enough without being droll and depressing. It is respectful of the original 1954 film while offering enough to make modern jaded audiences sit up and take notice. And as an added bonus, at no point does Matthew Broderick remark “that’s a lot of fish”. 

Summary: While there isn’t as much to the human characters as there could’ve been, Gareth Edwards serves up a spectacular royal rumble fit for the king. 
RATING: 4 out of 5 Stars

Jedd Jong