A Quiet Place Part II review

For F*** Magazine

Director: John Krasinski
Cast : Emily Blunt, Cillian Murphy, Millicent Simmonds, Noah Jupe, Djimon Hounsou, John Krasinski
Genre: Horror/Thriller/Sci-fi
Run Time : 97 min
Opens : 17 June 2021 (Sneaks from 5 June)
Rating : PG13

In 2018, A Quiet Place became a sleeper hit with audiences and critics alike. While John Krasinski had directed two feature films before, it was A Quiet Place that made everyone sit up and take notice of his skill behind the camera. The film’s box office success all but guaranteed that a sequel would be made, but especially after the pandemic has forced this sequel to be delayed for an additional year, can it live up to the brilliance of the first film?

After discovering that a high-frequency noise can drive away the monsters that have killed most of the earth’s population, the Abbott family must venture into the outside world. Evelyn (Emily Blunt) and her children Regan (Millicent Simmonds), Marcus (Noah Jupe), and a newborn baby leave the farm where they have been hiding for years. They come across fellow survivor Emmett (Cillian Murphy), whom they knew from before the monsters took over the earth. While the Abbotts are armed with a way of repelling the monsters, that doesn’t mean they’re safe, as they discover that the monsters are far from the only threats that lie in wait for them.

Krasinski continues to display strong directorial skill, staging several tense, thrilling set-pieces. The film’s opening sequence, which is a flashback that takes place on the very first day of the attack, is a killer way to start the film, allowing the audience to witness the initial moments of chaos that will change the Abbotts’ lives, and the lives of everyone else on earth, forever. This movie is not quite as scary as the first film, but there are a healthy amount of edge-of-your-seat moments.

The performances are as solid as they were in the first film, with Millicent Simmonds’ Regan getting more to do in this one. Cillian Murphy has a haunted quality to him that works well for the role of a ragged survivor. This film switches the character dynamics up by having Emmet try to protect Regan when she strikes out on her own, determined to find other survivors. This makes A Quiet Place Part II seem even more like the video game The Last of Us than the first movie did, with Emmet analogous to Joel and Regan analogous to Ellie.

Unfortunately, in trying to open the world and do something different, A Quiet Place Part II is not as good as the first movie. The sense of intimacy and the feeling of it being a very personal project for Krasinski and Blunt are somewhat diminished here, even though Krasinski arguably had more say over this one since he’s the sole credited writer. Krasinski was initially reluctant to return for the sequel, planning to pitch story ideas but hand the film off to another director, before he was convinced to return.

While Murphy puts in a good performance, Emmet can’t help but feel like a replacement for Krasinski’s Lee. The movie introduces some interesting ideas about the world beyond and certain groups of survivors, then quickly abandons them. Blunt has less to do here than one might expect. Also, since we already know what the monsters look like, they’re much more clearly visible in this film and sometimes feel a bit less scary because of it.

Just as in the first film, the sound design is an integral component in A Quiet Place Part II. The film very smartly uses the subjectivity of sound, with the sound dropping out entirely when we’re seeing – or rather, hearing – things from Regan’s point of view since the character is hearing-impaired. Sound designers Ethan Van der Ryn and Erik Aadahl and sound mixer Brandon Proctor do a marvellous job creating a soundscape for a world where making too much noise can be deadly. It’s especially interesting to start the film out with a flashback, seeing and hearing the world as normal, before jumping forward to show the contrast.

Summary: A Quiet Place Part II feels less personal than the first film, but considering the high bar that’s been set, it’s still a thoroughly thrilling, immersive experience and a remarkably well-made monster movie that is a further evolution of John Krasinski as a director. The film also serves as a showcase for Millicent Simmonds, arguably the breakout star of the first film. It’s well worth the additional year’s wait necessitated by the pandemic.

RATING: 4 out of 5 Stars

Jedd Jong

A Quiet Place movie review

For inSing

A QUIET PLACE

Director : John Krasinski
Cast : Emily Blunt, John Krasinski, Millicent Simmonds, Noah Jupe, Cade Woodward
Genre : Horror/Drama
Run Time : 1h 30m
Opens : 5 April 2018
Rating : PG13

In this horror thriller, silence is not only golden, but it’s the one thing that will keep what remains of humanity alive.

Vicious creatures that hunt by hearing have wiped out much of the earth’s population. The Abbott family, consisting of Lee (John Krasinski), his wife Evelyn (Emily Blunt) and their children Regan (Millicent Simmonds), Marcus (Noah Jupe) and Beau (Cade Woodward), are among the few people that remain. Living in a farmhouse, they have adopted a life of silence, as any sound they make could be their last. Grappling with loss and fear, the family that stays quiet together survives together.

A Quiet Place is directed by John Krasinski, who also rewrote a spec script by Bryan Woods and Scott Beck. Krasinski’s previous directorial efforts Brief Interviews with Hideous Men and The Hollars were indie comedy-dramas, the kind of films you’d expect from an actor making his foray into directing. With A Quiet Place, Krasinski boldly steps into genre territory with a film that seems like the work of a seasoned horror filmmaker.

Krasinski wastes no time in reeling the audience into the world he creates, and once the movie gets a hold of us, it never lets go. The set-up is elegant, and the movie doesn’t get bogged down with too much exposition. The threat is firmly established, and we get to know the characters and the world they’re living in without it ever feeling boring. There is minimal gore, rendering the little explicit blood and violence that we see even more effective.

The set pieces are simple but staged with great finesse, and the sense of dread is all-encompassing. The grain silo scene is a nail-biter of the highest order. The film falls back on more than a few jump scares, but these are earned because of the effort with which the world is drawn, and because the premise justifies them.

Charlotte Bruus Christensen’s cinematography conveys the family’s melancholy, and the manipulation of light and shadow during the creature attack sequences is right up there with the similar scenes from Alien. A film like this lives or dies by the sound design, which is executed meticulously and ramps up the tension.

Beyond the atmospherics, A Quiet Place does something many horror films struggle with: it makes the audience care deeply about its characters. We get invested in the plight of this family and want to see them make it through their ordeal. The cast is small, the scope is intimate, and while we’re curious as to what happened to the rest of the world, our focus is trained on the Abbotts.

All the performances are affecting, and the film benefits from real-life husband and wife Krasinski and Blunt playing off each other. The couple visibly draws on their own experiences as parents to portray people who go to great lengths to protect their children. At no point does this seem self-indulgent, even with Krasinski starring, directing and co-writing. Both Krasinski and Blunt convey great warmth and sadness. While there are moments when the characters are deathly afraid, these performances don’t feel like what one would typically find in a horror film, further elevating the material. Blunt in a farmhouse toting a shotgun also brings Looper to mind, and Looper coming to mind is rarely a bad thing.

Millicent Simmonds is outstanding as Regan. The character has agency and her personal frustrations, regret and tension with her parents are given considerable attention. Simmonds is deaf in real life and lends the film great authenticity. Krasinski stated that he cast Simmonds so she could teach the cast what it’s like to live in a silent world. Most of the ‘dialogue’ in the film is delivered via American Sign Language, which Simmonds taught the cast.

Jupe’s Marcus is sensitive and frightened – his father is gently trying to teach him the survival skills he needs. The interaction between the parents and their children is thoroughly convincing, and this helps immensely in selling the premise.

While rival horror-centric studio Blumhouse has critically acclaimed successes like Get Out, Platinum Dunes, founded by Michael Bay, Andrew Form and Brad Fuller, has been mostly pumping out poorly-received remakes of classic horror franchises. Ouija: The Origin of Evil was the closest a Platinum Dunes horror movie came to be excellent. A Quiet Place is the studio’s finest offering yet.

As hard as it would’ve been to believe ten years ago, Jim from The Office has made one of the finest suspense horror movies in recent memory. Krasinski demonstrates precise control and heart, giving the film a sense of novelty as he makes it into so much more than just its gimmick.

RATING: 4.5 out of 5 Stars

Jedd Jong