X-Men: Dark Phoenix review

X-MEN: DARK PHOENIX

Director: Simon Kinberg
Cast : Sophie Turner, James McAvoy, Michael Fassbender, Jennifer Lawrence, Tye Sheridan, Jessica Chastain, Nicholas Hoult, Kodi Smit-McPhee, Evan Peters, Alexandra Shipp, Ato Essandoh
Genre : Action/Adventure/Sci-fi
Run Time : 1 h 54 mins
Opens : 5 June 2019
Rating : PG13

Dead comic book characters have a habit of coming back to life, and none more so than Jean Grey/the Phoenix. “Mutant Heaven has no pearly gates, only revolving doors,” Professor X declared in X-Factor #70. The X-Men film series has a second go at adapting the Dark Phoenix storyline in what is also the final entry in this series.

During a rescue mission in space, Jean Grey (Sophie Turner) is exposed to an unidentified cosmic force which alters her telekinetic and telepathic superpowers, unleashing a powerful entity called the Dark Phoenix. Vuk (Jessica Chastain), the leader of the shape-shifting alien D’Bari race, arrives on earth to harness the power of the Dark Phoenix for herself. Raven Darkhölme/Mystique (Jennifer Lawrence) is angry at Charles Xavier/Professor X (James McAvoy) for endangering Jean in the name of what she feels is his self-aggrandisement.

Jean’s increasing instability directly endangers her boyfriend Scott Summers/Cyclops (Tye Sheridan), with the rest of the X-Men struggling with the onset of her destructive powers. Xavier must reluctantly join forces with his old ally-turned-enemy Erik Lensherr/Magneto (Michael Fassbender) to contain the threat posed by the Dark Phoenix.

X-Men: Dark Phoenix has had a rocky path to the big screen, with its release date being postponed at least three times. With long-time writer and producer Simon Kinberg making his directorial debut, Dark Phoenix feels like a group project which everyone worked hard on, but nobody is particularly proud of – something that got submitted just in time and which everyone is happy to be done with. This is a far cry from the grand finale that a film franchise as important to the current landscape of comic book movies as the X-Men series deserves.

There were a number of external factors acting on this film, and while Kinberg has claimed that the film was always planned as the end of the franchise and that Disney’s acquisition of Fox had no impact on the making of this film, there has been speculation to the contrary. This certainly feels like a much smaller film than X-Men: Apocalypse, its immediate predecessor in the mainline series of X-Men films. There is nothing wrong with a smaller X-Men film, and Logan proved how taking a more dramatic, less spectacle-driven approach can work within the larger framework of the franchise, but Logan this is not. At every turn, it feels like the filmmakers were settling for whatever they could manage, such that Dark Phoenix never touches the awe-inspiring grandeur of some of the previous entries in the series.

In X-Men: The Last Stand, the Dark Phoenix storyline had to jostle for real estate with the Gifted plot. There is more room in this film to explore what happens to Jean Grey after the Dark Phoenix is unleashed, but nothing carries the intended emotional impact. Still, Sophie Turner does an excellent job of playing a character who manifests immense power, and it’s clear that she understands the central conflict of Jean Grey. While the movie doesn’t delve deep enough into Jean’s tortured psyche, this is far from Turner’s fault.

McAvoy and Fassbender have become as identified with Professor X and Magneto respectively as Patrick Stewart and Ian McKellen have. While it is good to see them return to play these characters one last time, the weight of the tumultuous and far-reaching relationship between the two characters is all but absent. Xavier has become more self-absorbed after mutants have become accepted by wider sections of the populace, but this is far from the most compelling work McAvoy has done as the character.

The X-Men franchise got a hold of Jennifer Lawrence before she truly hit the big time, and her role in the Hunger Games movies seems to have caused the franchise to treat the character as a hero, when she has typically been a villain. It appears that Lawrence cannot wait to leave this role behind and is the most checked out she’s ever been in this film.

The film’s villains are almost laughably generic. The D’Bari come off like aliens from The X-Files. This is the first time extra-terrestrial beings figure into the X-Men movie franchise, but their existence is treated as no big deal. Jessica Chastain, an actor who can be a force of nature in the right role, is wasted as a character with no discernible personality to speak of.

While the script seems to strain to give everyone something to do, many of the supporting mutants are just kind of there. Characters like Hank McCoy/Beast (Nicholas Hoult), Ororo Munroe/Storm (Alexandra Shipp), Scott Summers/Cyclops (Tye Sheridan) and Kurt Wagner/Nightcrawler (Kodi Smit McPhee) mainly seem to be in this movie because they were in the earlier movies. It’s a shame given that these actors are all visibly doing the best they can.

X-Men: Dark Phoenix is not quite the flaming train wreck that is its central action set-piece, but because it’s the last film in the series and because it’s being released about a month after Avengers: Endgame, it is a deeply underwhelming affair. X-Men Dark Phoenix is a movie that has the misfortune of being at the wrong place at the wrong time, becoming a disappointing send-off for a movie franchise that many have become attached to.

RATING: 2.5 out of 5 Stars

Jedd Jong

Deadpool

For F*** Magazine

DEADPOOL 

Director : Tim Miller
Cast : Ryan Reynolds, Morena Baccarin, Ed Skrein, T. J. Miller, Gina Carano, Brianna Hildebrand, Stefan Kapičić, Leslie Uggams
Genre : Action/Comics
Run Time : 1 hr 49 mins
Opens : 11 February 2016
Rating : M18 (Sexual Scenes and Violence)

There’s an actual Deadpool movie and we’re reviewing it; this is a real pinch-me moment for any comic book fan. This X-Men spinoff centres around the invulnerable, trigger-happy, wisecracking, fourth wall-breaking antihero Deadpool. When mercenary Wade Wilson (Reynolds) is diagnosed with terminal cancer, he volunteers for an experimental procedure to cure him and grant him regenerative super-powers in the hopes that he can live out the rest of his days with the love of his life, Vanessa (Baccarin). Ajax (Skrein), one of the operatives in charge of his transformation, intends to torture Wade and lease his services to the highest bidder. Reborn as Deadpool, Wade seeks vengeance against Ajax and fears he won’t be able to win Vanessa back after being horribly disfigured, supported by his bartender friend Weasel (Miller) and blind landlady Al (Uggams). In the meantime, Colossus (Kapičić) and Negasonic Teenage Warhead (Hildebrand) of the X-Men are out to recruit Deadpool to join their band of do-gooders.

            There’s definitely an underdog quality to the Deadpool movie. For years, it seemed just out of reach, no matter how hard star/producer Reynolds lobbied for it to get made. Despite repeated attempts by Fox execs to suppress it, it’s seen the light of day and was definitely worth the wait. First-time feature film director Tim Miller helms the movie with admirable confidence and the brash, tongue-in-cheek tone is very faithful to the character’s portrayal in the comics. Screenwriters Rhett Reese and Paul Wernick of Zombieland fame have crammed the script with more smart-alecky pop culture references and snicker-inducing double entendres than you can shake a katana at. While this is still very much a straight-forward origin story decked out with bells and whistles, it is refreshing amidst the current landscape of comic book blockbusters which run the risk of feeling samey-samey. There’s a leanness to Deadpool that serves as a counterpoint to the bloat of more conventional franchise entries.

            Deadpool makes it known loud and proud that he’s far from a straight-arrow, nice guy superhero. He’s crass, cocky and all-around unpleasant, which means it might not be particularly easy to get audiences who aren’t already acquainted with his shenanigans to be in his corner. However, it is easy to see why Reynolds has such an affinity for the character, who like him, hails from Canada. Reynolds has been in a string of flops with most attempts at pushing him as an A-list leading man falling flat, and Deadpool is just the right material for his particular talents. To put it bluntly, Reynolds can sometimes come off as a bit of a douche, what with that smirking, handsome mug of his. Deadpool is unapologetically, 100% a douche. Surprisingly, Reynolds is also able to imbue the character with a decent amount of pathos and the sequence in which Wade is being tortured as he undergoes his transformation is genuinely affecting. There’s also a fight scene in which Reynolds gamely goes completely nude.

            The film’s limited budget means not being able to shell out for a star-studded supporting cast, a fact which is acknowledged as part of the self-aware humour. While the character is thinly-drawn, Baccarin is alluring as Vanessa and more than able to keep up with Reynolds’ non-stop snarking. A montage of Wade and Vanessa’s eyebrow-raising lovemaking proclivities is just the right combination of being a turn-on while also being hilariously uncomfortable. Colossus, with skin of metal and a heart of gold, provides plenty of laughs as well, despite the digital animation used to bring him to life falling a little short of the standard set by bigger-budgeted superhero movies. Miller’s comedic shtick can sometimes be annoying (see Transformers: Age of Extinction), but he tones things down and is able to sell Weasel as a comforting, familiar presence.

Alas, the film’s weakest point is its villains, with Skrein unable to bring much charisma or menace to the role of primary baddie Ajax. As Ajax’s henchwoman Angel Dust, MMA fighter Gina Carano stands around looking tough and throws punches when required. With his healing factor and formidable arsenal, Deadpool never actually faces a significant level of threat from his antagonists, but battling the bad guys consciously takes a back seat to the character strutting his irreverent stuff.



            Deadpoolgleefully crosses the line at any given opportunity, revelling in the violence, nudity and profanity like nobody’s business. It adheres to plenty of tropes we’ve seen before in comic book character origin stories, but there’s definitely a new spin on things here to enjoy. Sure, there are audiences who will find Deadpool too smug and obnoxious for their tastes, which is completely understandable. And there will teenagers who will emulate the character’s unsavoury manner, thinking it’s the definition of cool. But if you’re experiencing comic book movie fatigue (and really, who isn’t at this point?), Deadpool is a delightfully naughty shock to the system. And yes, stick around for the de rigeur post-credits stinger which hints at things to come, albeit in the movie’s own offbeat way.



Summary:A fan-favourite character finally gets his due. While not as unconventional as it would like to be, Deadpool is what fans have been waiting for and is enjoyable in its wholehearted embracing of the source material.

RATING: 4out of 5 Stars

Jedd Jong  

“I’ve already broken three WALL-Es before you!” 


STGCC 2015: Jim Cheung interview

STGCC 2015: JIM CHEUNG INTERVIEW
by Jedd Jong
British comic book artist Jim Cheung is in Singapore for the first time as a special guest of the Singapore Toy, Games and Comics Convention. Cheung has drawn for Marvel and CrossGen and has risen as one of Marvel’s superstar artists, having been named a “young gun”, a potential superstar, by Editor-in-chief Joe Quesada in 2005.

Cheung is probably best known for pencilling Young Avengers. Alongside writer Allan Heinberg, Cheung created characters such as Iron Lad, Hulkling, Wiccan, Hawkeye (Kate Bishop) and Speed.

At CrossGen, Cheung pencilled Scion and has gone on to draw such titles as New Avengers: Illuminati, Avengers: The Children’s Crusade and X-Force for Marvel. He has also done cover art for Avengers vs. X-Men and World War Hulk: Warbound.

Speaking to other journalists and I, Cheung looks back on his career, shares his inspirations and influences, weighs in on the aesthetics of the Marvel Cinematic Universe and talks about his persistence in getting a page right.

It has been ten years since you were named one of Marvel’s “young guns”.

Oh, don’t remind me! [Laughs]

What was that like and looking back over your career, what has the journey been like so far?

It’s been a hell of a journey, I would see. It was definitely a surprise to be named a “young gun” back in 2004…2005, because I’d already been in the business a good ten years, so to be named a “young gun” was definitely unusual. It was definitely an honour, definitely a privilege to be amongst so many artists and such enormous talent. I guess it did in some ways further my career a lot. Thanks to that book, Young Avengers, it really helped my career a long way, because that was my big return to Marvel because before that, I went to work for CrossGen for a few years. It was an unusual point to jump in, the fact that it became a hit was definitely a big bonus.

What are the main inspirations for your current art style?

Current art style? It’s really like a bastardized style of a lot of my favourite artists. I kind of look at artists that I like and critically break it down, take different elements of what I like and try to incorporate it into my work and then it just becomes natural, that’s just the way it’s always been. I’m more an assimilator in a way, because if you look at my early work, you can see it’s very crude but then it gets more and more refined, because I’m looking at other people’s work and getting influenced by it. That’s why when I went to CrossGen, I was able to be in a studio with a whole bunch of artists for the very first time, and I was able to “steal” from them quite comprehensively.

Who were some of these artists who inspired you?

At CrossGen, there was a whole bunch of people. I worked very simply back in the day. When I was in London, I never worked with a lightbox before, then when I went to CrossGen, I saw people working with lightboxes so I got very curious. I developed a style where I started doing layouts very roughly and placed them underneath the finished board, whereas before I used to draw everything straight and I didn’t think about moving it over, once I started doing that, pieces started becoming starting much tighter. And looking at other artists’ work, like Greg Land who was also in the studio, seeing how much photo reference he was using, how he was using it, how Steve Epting was using the blacks in his pages, things like that were adding to my work.

What went into creating the characters who formed the Young Avengers, alongside Allan Heinberg?

Basically, I was just given the descriptions from Allan and from Tom Brevoort, the editor, and I just went away and did some rough designs. I kept doing multiple designs until I was comfortable with something to hand in to show them. A lot of them were very crude to begin with because they just basically said “do younger versions of the Hulk, of the Avengerscharacters.” So I was trying to give it a more modern twist while retaining a lot of those classic elements in making those characters, so it was a lot of trial and error, a lot of playing around, a lot of moving things around.
Is there a project you’ve worked on that you’d like to tackle?

I haven’t done any DC stuff in a long time and I’m very curious about that. I’d love to do some Batman stuff, some Justice League, although I really should be shying away from doing team books because it takes me forever to do them. For some reason, they keep hiring me to do team books, like Axis and certain characters.

As an artist, what are your thoughts on the visual style of the films that form the Marvel Cinematic Universe?

I love the fact that they kind of look like superheroes, although in some ways, I’m less keen on some of the complicated outfits because I like things clean, simple, visually arresting. With the movies, sometimes they can get overly complicated with their designs, I think it takes away…it kind of gets generic after a while. If there are rivets and buttons everywhere, then there isn’t that much colour, it can look very samey-samey. That’s some of the issues I’ve had with the movies, some of the characters could be interchangeable and it wouldn’t even matter. I understand that, because they have to make it sophisticated for the movie audience, but at the same time, it can be overdone. The good thing with the Marvel movies is that at least they still somewhat resemble the comic book versions, they’re still very distinctive.



How do you overcome artist’s block?

Partly why I’m so slow is because I’m constantly struggling to get things right, that’s why when people ask me to video myself and put it up on YouTube, my process and how I draw, I’d be like “70% of the time will be erasing what I’ve just drawn so it will be a very, very boring video.” I get artist’s block, unfortunately, I’m too stupid to walk away, I just keep hammering at it. Sometimes I will switch to other pages and they’ll come easier.

What do you struggle in getting right, is it the composition?

The composition, the way I draw a face, it can never come out right sometimes. Sometimes I think it’s important to have a different perspective on things, which is why with the lightbox it lets you switch things over, so you turn the page over, everything’s completely different, so sometimes that helps as well.

If you had a chance to work on a movie or television series in the Marvel Cinematic Universe, would you be willing to do it?

I don’t think I’m really suited to it. I’d certainly be interested; it’s a whole different field.

Which series would you be interested in?

I want to do a Young Avengers series, yes [laughs].
Is there a character in particular that you enjoy drawing the most?

I really enjoy drawing Thor, I kind of like the Thor eras that I grew up with. I don’t think I’m the best at drawing Spider-Man [but] I do enjoy drawing Spider-Man. I’ve become very comfortable drawing Captain America, even though his costume just becomes more and more complicated. Favourite character…default characters are usually those guys. I’m so used to drawing Marvel characters, that’s the problem, when I’m finally asked to draw DC characters, I’m like “how do you draw Batman again?” [Laughs]

How much leeway to you get to re-interpret a character? When you’re assigned to a book, do you get a chance to redesign the characters’ costumes?

Sometimes. If I’m asked to redesign a costume, then I will try to stay faithful to…I grew up in the 80s so I have a certain image of those characters, so if I’m asked to redesign those characters, I often refer to those as a starting point in a way. Some of the costumes have deviated so much, they look so different than how they used to look that it’s a completely different character with a totally different costume. So I like to bring it back sometimes with more familiar elements. I try to play around with that.


What was your gateway into reading comics?

Very early on, it was Spider-Man. In the UK, they used to reprint all the comics, the weeklies, so I used to come home, after lunch, and read it.

So it was always superheroes rather than war or horror comics?

I did read some of that stuff, but I didn’t really take to it. I read 2000 AD, but I always went back to Marvel characters. I just like the Spider-Man character, maybe it’s because with 2000 AD the stories progressed too slowly, they were always too short, six pages, there was never enough story and by the next week it was another six pages. It just didn’t flow as well.

Most British creators cut their teeth on 2000 AD, how did you break into comics?

I just didn’t start like I was “supposed” to. Back in the 90s, I didn’t really know how to break in. I didn’t know you had to do samples, you had to show them to the right people, so that’s what I did, it just happened to be that the people I showed them to were from Marvel, so I was lucky enough to get my foot in the door there.

What would you say is the hardest part of working in comics?

The hardest part is keeping your game up, I would say. The quality of the artwork these days is amazing. There are kids coming out of high school with better Photoshop skills than I can achieve right now. There’s a level of technology that I never had, they’re so comfortable with those programs, it’s a challenge to try and keep growing.

Does your process involve any digital work?

It does, yes. Nowadays, I do a little fumbling, I scan them in and I play around with them a little bit, I move around elements until I’m happy.



If you were tasked with reimagining the Young Avengers as they are now, what changes would you make?

The way it currently is? I would probably bring it back to the old team. No disrespect to what Jamie McKelvie and Kieron Gillen did, it’s just wasn’t the same team for me, because they were introducing all these new characters and for me, it didn’t quite come across the same way. Maybe it’s the writer; Allan had a certain way with the characters as well. I enjoyed those core characters that I helped design, it’s very personal.

What was it like creating the Comic-Con promotional poster for the new season of Agents of S.H.I.E.L.D., and would you like to see movie posters return towards hand-drawn art, as unlikely as that may be?

It was actually quite an honour to do that poster for Comic-Con. I don’t think I’m the strongest guy when it comes to likenesses, so I try to shy away from that as much as possible, but when I was asked to do it, I thought it would be a great opportunity to try and do something that was like the movie posters, James Bond-style, all the elements, like similar to the old classic James Bond movies. That’s what I wanted to do. Luckily it turned out okay, I think. There’s a few things I would change, but there are always things I would change.

Are there any things in geek culture that you’re looking forward to, be it movies, TV or other media?

I’m trying to stay away as much as I can from the Star Wars stuff, you can’t escape it unfortunately. I’m kind of looking forward to seeing how that turns out. I’m also curious to see how the Marvel movies progress, to show the Infinity War. Like everybody else, I’m excited just the same, even though we all have a rough idea of what the story’s going to be like from the comics. It’s always cool to see on the big screen.

In your opinion, what is the most important component of visual storytelling?

The most important element is just clarity of storytelling, making sure the reader can follow everything that’s moving along. One of my rules when I’m laying out a book is that every issue can be somebody’s first, so you’ve got to make sure that it’s clear enough for somebody to pick up, or they aren’t going to be able to follow the story. I’ve picked up books where I’ve tried to read the story, but it’s so confusing because things are bouncing around all the time, it’s lost me even as a seasoned comic book reader. When I see that, I think that’s just missed opportunities – but again, that’s just me being very, very critical. It’s always easy being critical of other people’s work, failing to notice your own flaws.

What do you feel is the reason behind Marvel putting you on a lot of event books?

I don’t know, I think maybe they think I can handle the multiple characters, that’s why they give it to me. I also consider it a privilege, they think that I’m worthy to work on those tentpole events. I don’t question it too much, I just enjoy the opportunity.

Are you involved much with the planning of events?

Not at all, not at all. They just bring me in and show me the script.

Has there been a moment in the industry where you geeked out on a meeting a hero of yours?

I tried to avoid meeting my heroes as far as I can. Sometimes, it can affect your perception of the way you read it, I don’t know if you’ve ever met your heroes, sometimes if they give you a disappointing [first] impression, it affects everything you see from them afterwards. In some ways, I try and avoid that, but the people that I have met are great.
Thanks for an excellent interview Jim!

STGCC 2015 Day 1: Mega Picture Post

Here’s the first part of my annual Singapore Toy, Games and Comics Convention Mega Picture post! Brace yourselves, it be a long one.

A very Imperial welcome

Hot Toys’ First Order Stormtroopers

Mysterious Force Awakens baddie Kylo Ren

KidsLogic’s actually-hovering DeLorean

Life-sized Hulk vs. Hulkbsuter display

“Get me outta here!” 

Fightsaber’s demonstration

I do know the power of the Dark Side

“Not so tough without your ship, eh?” “Ditto”

Well, technically an Ant-Man figure of any size could be considered “life-sized”

Michael Keaton and Adam West Batmen

The very epitome of cool.

Rocket and Groot, cosmic besties.

Loki conspires, as he does.

Anyone seen my daughter?

Cosplay celebrity Stella Chuu

“LET OFF SOME STEAM, BENNET!”

The King of the Seas on his pincer throne

Beguiling, even as an unpainted prototype

Writer Wayne Ree and artist Gene Whitlock, who together form Global Beards!

Raven

My pal Jaye as 2015 edition Marty McFly

She’s got the worried Michael J. Fox face down.

Assemble!

Hoverboards that can actually hover! Disclaimer: not intended for use over water.

Immortan Joe takes shape.

With my friend Gwen as Han Solo

Neptys Ennoae as Shao Jun from Assassin’s Creed Chronicles

First of many Red Hoods this weekend

Honey Lemon from Big Hero 6

Digging the “Jabba as satay vendor” diorama

Stay!

Agent Peggy Carter

Red Hood

Harley Quinn, an ever-popular character choice.

Alexander Jameouson Tan as the Joker, all too proud of himself for having killed Jason Todd

Brian Dennison as a thoroughly on-point Petyr “Littlefinger” Baelish

A double serving of Harley! 

Digging the combination of biker and tactical gear this Red Hood is rocking

Mezame as Margarita Guy from Jurassic World!

Tadashi and Hiro from Big Hero 6

He ain’t heavy, he’s my brother

Exquisite craftsmanship on that crown!

Ghostbusters and Back to the Future – so 80s I can’t even

Check out the detail on those proton packs!

First Order Stormie backpack! So cute. 

Jack Frost and Booker DeWitt – eh, I’ve seen stranger mashups

Party like it’s 2099

Booker, catch!

Cap and an old enemy

“Put me down Quill! This is demeaning!” 

Baroness and Storm Shadow from GI JOE

“2015 is all this and no Jaws 19! We’ve got to fix things Doc!”

But soft, what light from Yondu window breaks?

Talking comics with C.B. Cebulski, Adi Granov, Jim Cheung and Adam Hughes

Capn’ Spidey

Theodora as Black Widow taking it out on lil Loki

Ame-Comi Wonder Woman

Deathstroke

Green Arrow

Goofing with Ollie – just about my fave selfie of the day

People mountain; people sea

Daenerys and her dragon.

Deadpool, perfectly in character

Ollie Evolutions

Joey as Ms. Marvel

Peggy and plushie Cap!

XM Studios’ phenomenal work

XM Studios Daredevil

XM Studios’ conceptual Japanese-styled Batman

All of these designs are really well thought out!

There’s always a Man…

Sam as Hulkling, chewing on Loki

Kie as Wiccan with Sam as Hulkling

Talking comics with C.B. Cebulski, Adi Granov, Jim Cheung and Adam Hughes

Marvel superstar artist Jim Cheung, best-known for co-creating the Young Avengers with Allan Heinberg

Such a handsome fellow. Swoons.

Stella Chuu getting her Power Ranger groove on

Wait, I thought you guys were brothers! Nevermind.

Jenny as Elsa

Frasier as Rorschach from Watchmen

Wonder Woman, Supergirl and lil Batsy

Quicksilver is not impressed

Trench run diorama! 

The Simpsons enjoying a live performance by the Bith musicians. Yes yes the genre of music is called Jizz, I know.

Glowy glowy

Jim Cheung with his creations Wiccan and Hulkling

The 12th Doctor and Missy

Not a hugger.

Regeneration makes you taller?

The ever-lovely Belle as Zatanna Zatara!

Z is for Zelfie

Darren as Slender Man – those proportions are perfect!

Rorschach vs. Slendy

Michael Baypool

Rorschach and Baypool!

F***in’ Money!

Matching Mum and daughter Leias

Dave as Leonidas, making me feel inferior as always.

Ant-Man

Suicide Squad Joker and Harley

Suicide Squad Joker and Harley

Natasha has red on her ledger, but Blue Sky on the brain.

San Diego Comic-Con International 2015: The Cosplay

Hey everyone, I’ve just returned from my third year at San Diego Comic-Con. While I didn’t have as good an experience as last year, I’m not taking the privilege for granted and as with the two previous years, here is my series of mega picture posts. Here we go with – 

THE COSPLAY

Kicking it off with a cosplayer as Jay Garrick, the original Flash! In the bottom left hand of the display case, you’ll see the prop helmet from that amazing moment in the Flash season finale when it tumbled out of the portal.

“I will break you!” “I will make you tell the truth!”

Gender-flipped Joker and Poison Ivy
Gamora! 

Batman of Zur-En-Arrh, with Bat-mite in a baby bjorn. Or maybe that’s Bat-mite with Zur-En-Arrh as a backpack

5 + 11!

Ridiculous abs. Just ludicrous. Unbelievable. Other superlative adjectives.

With LeeAnna Vamp

GlaDOS

Zatanna attempts to keep Batman out of Deadpool’s grasp

Pretty hard for Deadshot to miss because Batman’s right there in his hand.

Reverse Flash: “grr, curse you Barry!”

Fourth Doctor!

This gentleman can’t help but give a far more amiable smile than the Joker’s known for. Still cool!

The chainmail section on this Green Arrow’s costume is neat!

Look close enough and you can see the Batman figure blush.

Hey Kristoff!

Lots of Mad Lovin’ couples, as with most years.

It’s Slumber Party Harley! D’aww.

Agent Carter’s a little thrown by someone who’s fallen in from the wrong universe.

Stormin’ it up

This Comedian has the psychotic grin nailed pat!

Hey 11! 

Fraggin’ great Lobo!

Hooked on a feeling and shooting straight!

“Mr. Fredricksen, may I please have a photo?”

There’s the War Doctor in the middle! NO MOAR! 

Arkham City Harley!

KidPool

One of many Harleys rocking the Suicide Squad movie look.

Sisterhood of the con-going dresses

I am the one who knocks! And is the first in line for the exclusives!

Mega-Man!

Raven

Well hello there Amy Pond!

Bat-villains, including a gender-flipped Harley Quinn!

The Arkham Knight look for Harley’s one of the favourites so far.

11 is 10’s mum? Awesome!

The Boy Who Waited and his Kissogram beau! 

Steampunk Poison Ivy!

Pretty much the best Spider-Gwen cosplay I’ve ever seen. I think she might be Maid of Might cosplay. 
“Who’s scruffy-looking?”

Hey 12! How about a hug!

Don’t blink. Blink and you’re…

TOO LATE!

Why yes, I would kiss that Ms. Quinzel.

Just the sweetest-looking Ariel!

The Black Queen, Jean Grey

Loki and Black Widow looking great together!
Love this Barry’s good-natured grin
X-cellent! And an Adorable Cyclops leading the charge, too!
Another lovely Arkham City Harley!
No disintegrations Boba!
Steph Batgirl!


I was wearing just the right shirt for it, too!

Jurassic World Margarita Guy! Just about my favourite cosplay this year.
Squirrel Girl’s guns
It’s a Mad Mad Mad Mad Wonderful World


Scarlet Witch and Quicksilver group cosplays were very popular this year!

Captain Cold and Golden Glider have Ollie in their sights!
Star Wars: Knights of the Old Republic Sith Lord
Cruella de Vil, Cruelle de Vil, if she doesn’t scare you, no evil thing will…
Darth Revan
Ash celebrating the release of Ash vs. The Evil Dead raising his boomstick!
Capable from Mad Max: Fury Road
Love this Gamora’s costume and makeup, and it helps that she looks like Zoe Saldana too!
This gender-flipped Quicksilver from Days of Future Past is adorable!
Cutest little Berserker rage
Lady Deadpool
Boba Knievel
Hey Poison Ivy! Hmm, that looks a lot like an Ariel wig. 
Eye candy for all.
Knirhs!
Double serving of Owen with a print of T. rex concept art!
Triple Pratting at Comic-Con
Back to back Pratt!
Really rad Quicksilver and Scarlet Witch – that Quicksilver in particular has quite the likeness to Aaron Taylor-Johnson!
This George Lucas cosplayer was carrying a sign that said “Jar Jar 4 Life” on one side and “Greedo Shot First” on the other.
The World’s Finest – doesn’t matter that Batman’s six inches tall.
Awesome throwback with Batman and Joker from Batman ’89!
Immortan Joanna and Nux
Lady Sif and Thor
John Hammond, who has spared no expense.
Red Hood

Arkham Knight Red Hood

Check out the back of that jacket!
Ring ring! Shame!

Hey kids, it’s Mikey!

Gender-flipped Indy

And gender-flipped Han!

A.I.M. soldiers – for science!

An appropriately sinister Jafar

Gender-flipped Daredevil taking on the Kingpin

Claire has had it with Owen’s antics

Let it not be said that I studied theatre for nothing!

Cap and Widow

Flash and Batgirl

More Poison Ivy

Lara Croft

And a Lara based on the reboot game!

Great Scott, it’s Doc Brown!

Double dose of mini-Ahsoka, joined by Boba Cap

Beyond.

Cutest lil Thor

The mum’s Ursula and the daughter’s Ariel…messed up but wonderful!

Poison Ivy

Black Mask

’66 Catwoman

Comic-Con wouldn’t be complete without a Slave Leia!

Excellent Daenerys cosplay!

Mother of Raptors

Gender-flipped Green Arrow

Morpheus offers the red pill or the blue pill.

Jem! Truly truly outrageous!

Think McFly!

Great Scott, it’s a timey wimey confluence of temporal voyagers!

Another Margarita guy carries his beloved cocktails away from the Pterosaurs

Black Widow and the Winter Soldier

Rogue and Angie from Agent Cater

Galactus, right before devouring that world

Casey Jones, with an Arrow figure since Stephen Amell’s playing the character in the next film.

Ace Ventura, Mutant Detective

Uncharted: Drake’s Convention

Zoey and Mal from Firefly

And we cap it off with a tale as old as time. Gorgeous Belle (which is a tautology)

X-Men: Days of Future Past – Singapore Press Conference Photo Highlights

Singapore was among the seven cities chosen for the global premieres of X-Men: Days of Future Past. Stars Hugh Jackman, Peter Dinklage and Fan Bingbing graced the blue carpet on 14th May and held a press conference at the Ritz Carlton Hotel on the 15th. Here are some photo highlights from the press conference that day.

True gentlemen. 

Hot 91.3 deejay Joshua Simon asked to speak to Wolverine himself and wanted to know if Logan eats his steak with cutlery, or just stabs at the ribeye with his claws. Wolverine didn’t take too kindly to the question and the matter was taken outside. I think it was a pretty clear fight. 

Note Peter Dinklage’s Batman and Robin shirt. We have a DC sympathizer in our midst (yay!)